Fire wall

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fire wall

[′fīr ‚wȯl]
(civil engineering)
A fire-resisting wall separating two parts of a building from the lowest floor to several feet above the roof to prevent the spread of fire.
A fire-resisting wall surrounding an oil storage tank to retain oil that may escape and to confine fire.
(mining engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Fire wall

1. An interior or exterior wall having sufficiently high fire resistance and structural stability under conditions of fire to restrict its spread to adjoining areas or adjacent buildings.
2. Any fire-resistant wall that separates one building from another or that subdivides a large building into smaller spaces; it is usually continuous from the foundations extending above the roof. See also: Wall
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

fire wall

A wall so constructed as to prevent the spread of fire from one part of a building to another.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

firewall

The primary method for keeping a computer secure from intruders. A firewall allows or blocks traffic into and out of a private network or the user's computer. Firewalls are widely used to give users secure access to the Internet as well as to separate a company's public Web server from its internal network. Firewalls are also used to keep internal network segments secure; for example, the accounting network might be vulnerable to snooping from within the enterprise.

In the home, a personal firewall typically comes with or is installed in the user's computer (see Windows Firewall). Personal firewalls may also detect outbound traffic to guard against spyware, which could be sending your surfing habits to a website. They alert you when software makes an outbound request for the first time (see spyware).

In the organization, a firewall can be a stand-alone machine (see firewall appliance) or software in a router or server. It can be as simple as a single router that filters out unwanted packets, or it may comprise a combination of routers and servers each performing some type of firewall processing. For more about the various firewall techniques, see firewall methods.


An Excellent Resource
O'Reilly's "Building Internet Firewalls, 2nd Edition" by Zwicky, Cooper and Chapman is one of the best books written on Internet and Web security. It covers a huge range of firewall and related topics and should be a "must have" for anyone interested in the subject. (O'Reilly & Associates, Inc., 2000)
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