Firishta


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Firishta

or

Ferishta

(both: fĭrĭshtă`), c.1560–c.1620, Indian Muslim historian. His given name was Muhammad Kasim Hindu Shah. Under the patronage of the shah of Bijapur, he wrote a history of the Muslims in India from the 10th cent. His work, translated as History of the Rise of the Mohamedan Power in India (tr. 1829), is a landmark in Indian historiography, for it gives detailed knowledge of the medieval period in India.
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The description about pre-Hindu Shahi rulers is given by Sharif-e-Muhammad son of Mansur, who is quoted by Firishta in 'Tabaqat-e-Basiri' states: 'Bhandara's son was a wicked man named Bharat (Banrat) who used his army to imprison his father in the fort of Lahore.
When Ulugh Khan was informed of this development, he lost hope of finding the princess but here, according to Firishta's history, luck favoured the Khilji forces.
According to the histories by Firishta and Badauni, Deval Devi was then brought to Sultan Mubarak's harem and resided therein in an environment of abysmal debauchery for the next four years.
Asth or Ashtpal was the name of the father of Jayapala (Firishta 1974: 90) the last great Odi Shahi or Hindi Shahi ruler who valiantly opposed first Sabuktigin the ruler of Ghazna and then his son
(61) The seventeenth-century dynastic historian Firishta mentions that from his childhood, 'Ali "was remarkable for his ready wit and various accomplishments," (62) while the chronicler Rafi al-Din Shirazi, who from the age of thirty served as steward and scribe at 'Al[l.bar] '[A.bar]dil sh[a.bar]h's court in Bijapur, introduces him as follows:
The Nauras Mahal, the centrepiece of the city, was in essence a visual metaphor for the word nauras which Firishta has interpreted as nine virtues (though it may be understood also as "nine flavours" or "new flavours").
In the process, some of the evidence has occasionally been driven a little further than more cautious historians might have done, and there is a rather heavy reliance on the deeply credulous Firishta for events that happened considerably before his time.
Firishta, an Afghan and the mother of four, spoke to me later and confirmed she had been at Sangatte but arrived at Dover 14 days ago.
What happened can be seen in the description of Firishta in 'Tarikh-e-Feroz Shahi'.
In his analysis of the Persian sources for the history of Firuz Shah's reign, Eaton remarks that too much reliance has been placed on the account of Firishta, written between 1606 and 1611.