first-generation computer

first-generation computer

[¦fərst jen·ə¦rā·shən kəm′pyüd·ər]
(computer science)
A computer from the earliest stage of computer development, ending in the early 1960s, characterized by the use of vacuum tubes, the performance of one operation at a time in strictly sequential fashion, and elementary software, usually including a program loader, simple utility routines, and an assembler to assist in program writing.

first-generation computer

A computer that used vacuum tubes as switching elements; for example, the UNIVAC I. See computer generations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pioneer Electronics announced in October that many of its DVD-R/RW first-generation computer drives and set-top recorders will require a firmware upgrade prior to using new high speed recordable discs.
Though their products are now bought by millions of people around the world, in 1976 the company's bosses - Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak and Ron Wayne - hand-made just 200 of the first-generation computers.