Fish Spear

Fish Spear

 

(in Russian, ostroga), a forked, piercing implement used in fishing. The tines of a fish spear are usually metal; however, wooden or bone tines are used among some peoples. Russian fishermen mounted an iron spear resembling a pitchfork on a slender pole (ratovishche), which was approximately 4 m long. There usually were three tines, but sometimes there were as few as two or as many as 12. Each tine was about 0.25 m long and had a barb to hold the fish securely.

A two-tined spear (sandov’) formerly used in the Caspian Sea for catching sheatfish had an iron ring at the end of the handle with a towline, which was reeled by hand or was attached to the boat. Another variation of the fish spear was a harpoonlike instrument (kutilo) used for hunting various types of sea animals.

In the USSR, spear fishing is illegal.

References in periodicals archive ?
The suspect then allegedly saw a fish spear nearby and used it to stab the victim at least four times resulting in his death.
All these parts, including pieces of the nets were found buried and preserved in the muck of the Key Marco archaeological site, on Marco Island, FL I have also replicated various fish spears, and a two-pronged fish spear called a leister.
Fish spear or gig with spring-loaded jaws, as identified by Gary Webster, New Port Richey, Fla.; Del Junker, Sioux Falls, S.D.; Ken Ostlund, Marine on St.
Techniques for tying knots as well as building blowguns, fish spears, bird bolas, crossbows and boomerangs are included.
The vast majority of fish speared are males, leaving the female fish to lay their eggs.
He noted that wooden and bone-tipped prongs of fish spears were being replaced with prongs made from fencing wire by the time of his visit (Spencer 1928:797).
Russians Vladmir Medvedev, 44, and Maxim, 14, lived on rainwater and raw fish speared with the aerial of their broken radio after their 50ft boat hit a rock in the Indian Ocean.