fisheye

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Related to Fish-eye: Fish eye disease

fisheye

[′fish‚ī]
(materials)
A small globular mass which has not blended completely into the surrounding material and is particularly evident in a transparent or translucent material, such as a plastic coating or surface coating.
(metallurgy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fisheye

In plastering, a spot in the finish coat approximately ¼ in. (6.4 mm) in diameter, caused by lumpy lime.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This configuration--known in physics as Maxwell's fish-eye lens--is a theoretical construct that is only slightly similar to commercially available fish-eye lenses for cameras and telescopes.
A general tendency of the fish-eye cracks was to grow in opening mode I as revealed by the orientation of the crack plane that changed from being perpendicular to the specimen's longitudinal axis for pure bending to a tangential inclination (along the circumference) of ~45[degrees] for torsion.
Using fish-eye lenses for any measurement purpose, a large amount of distortion should be taken into consideration, modeled and mitigated.
Recording a narrative verdict, the jury said: "We believe the fish-eye lens was unsuitable for purpose.
To ensure the panoramic camera captures the same scene content that the PTZ camera covers, the fish-eye camera is fixed inclining towards the gravity direction (Figures 3(a)3(c)).
Student Greg Dash's Lofi Fish-Eye camera is little over 4cm long and 2cm high, has only one button and no LCD screen.
Platinum Pac: A premium, specially coated PAC designed for easy mixing without fish-eye formation.
You then screw on the special lens and you can take 180-degree fish-eye snaps on your mobile.
Accurate sample positioning is supported by a fish-eye chamber camera and an integrated light microscope with 10X and 100X magnifications.
The two fish-eye lenses house a new infrared array detector which enhances performance with regard to the range at which a missile firing will be detected, offer improved rejection of false alarms and give an angular localisation capability which will be compatible with the future use of Directional Infrared Counter Measures (Dircm).
Fish-eye lens: The angler is Mail photographer John Randle, dressed for the part and about to "land" his 35mm Nikon motor drive camera, with a fish-eye lens.