fissile

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fissile

1. Brit capable of undergoing nuclear fission as a result of the impact of slow neutrons
2. US and Canadian capable of undergoing nuclear fission as a result of any process
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fissile

[′fis·əl]
(geology)
Capable of being split along the line of the grain or cleavage plane.
(nucleonics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
239Pu: Plutonium is a fissile isotope generated artificially when uranium-238, through irradiation, captures an extra neutron.
This is uranium ore -not 'uranium' as you report -and requires huge enrichment plants to increase the 0.7 per cent fissile isotope within the ore into the 90 per cent needed for weapons.
The biggest challenge for Baghdad was how to convert natural uranium, only about 0.7% of which comprises the fissile isotope U-235, to a metal containing the required 90% of this isotope.
The license authorizes GLE to enrich uranium up to eight percent by weight in the fissile isotope U-235, using a laser-based technology for use in fuel for commercial nuclear power reactors.
Thousands of old model centrifuges spin at supersonic speeds in an underground hall to increase the fissile isotope ratio.
Iran has now produced more than 3,600 kilograms of low-enriched uranium; if processed into higher proportions of the fissile isotope U-235, this amount could theoretically be enough for several atomic bombs.
Second, Iraq would have needed vast enrichment plants to increase the 0.7 per cent fissile isotope within the uranium ore into the 90 per cent needed for weapons.
This potential energy stored in an explosive material may be: Chemical energy, such as nitroglycerin or grain dust; Pressurized gas, such as a gas cylinder or aerosol can; Nuclear energy, such as in the fissile isotopes uranium-235 and plutonium-239.
The remaining 99.3 percent is mostly the U-238 isotope which does not contribute directly to the fission process (though it does so indirectly by the formation of fissile isotopes of plutonium).