fission product

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fission product

[′fish·ən ‚präd·əkt]
(nuclear physics)
Any radioactive or stable nuclide resulting from fission, including both primary fission fragments and their radioactive decay products.
References in periodicals archive ?
These materials account for much of the risk posed by the waste after the first several hundred years, by which time most of the fission product inventory will have decayed to harmless levels.
Partly as a result of the Chernobyl accident of 1986, the Russian mortality rate has risen by 37 percent, from 10.2 deaths per thousand persons in 1984 to 14.6 in 1993, giving us a grim glimpse of our own future if we continue to ignore the warnings of the health effects of low-level radiation from the ingestion of nuclear fission products. Udall is the highest-ranking public official with the courage and wisdom to tell us why we must end our cold war affair with the atom.
In this individual, MII cells were biased towards the presence of the inverted chromosome 4 with the fission products of chromosome 1.
In this fuel, uranium dioxide or uranium nitride is embedded within tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particles, which use several layers, including a silicon carbide layer, to contain fission products [10].
Below ground siting lessens the potential impact of external events such as aircraft collision or natural disasters, while reducing the number of paths for fission product release following any accident.
Some of the fission products must remain isolated for several hundred years, but there is no need for Yucca Mountain-type repositories intended to last millennia.
Nuclear reactor safety focuses on providing multiple containment barriers and reliable cooling to allow for the safe radioactive decay of short-lived fission products after reactor shutdown.
The Chernobyl accident produced an acute, rapid exposure, mostly to [sup.131]I but also to a mixture of other fission products.
Beyond normal operation, in the remote possibility of loss of control, even PBMRs producing somewhat more thermal power than the reactor planned by Eskom can withstand any series of failures without releasing fission products. That statement was proved by an experiment conducted in 1986 on the AVR, a German pebble bed reactor.
In conventional reprocessing, uranium and plutonium are separated from the fission products and other actinides in the spent fuel.
* The 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident released large quantities of radioactive fission products over vast areas of the Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia.
Because the fragments move at nearly the uranium beam's velocity and because they are totally stripped of electrons, "the fission products are much easier to detect than in previous experiments," Bernas explains.