Fitch, Clyde

Fitch, Clyde

(William Clyde Fitch), 1865–1909, American dramatist, b. Elmira, N.Y. An extremely prolific and versatile playwright, he wrote over 36 original plays, including melodramas, farces, social comedies, and historical dramas. Much of his best work reflects American social life of the period. Among his most notable plays are Nathan Hale (1898), The Climbers (1901), The Girl with the Green Eyes (1902), The Truth (1907), and The City (1909). His works were popular both in the United States and in Europe.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Fitch, (William) Clyde

(1865–1909) playwright; born in Elmira, N.Y. He began by writing plays based on historical figures—Beau Brummel (1890), Nathan Hale (1898), and Barbara Freitchie (1899)—but he soon moved toward social comedy, at which he was immensely successful (although modern critics complain about their contrived endings). Among his popular works were The Moth and the Flame (1898), Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines (1901), and The City (1909).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.