fjord

(redirected from Fjords)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

fjord

or

fiord

(fyôrd), steep-sided inlet of the sea characteristic of glaciated regions. Fjords probably resulted from the scouring by glaciers of valleys formed by any of several processes, including faulting and erosion by running water. When the regions occupied by these glaciers subsided, the valleys were drowned by the sea. The fjord coast lines of Norway, Scotland, Greenland, Alaska, British Columbia, S Chile, S New Zealand, and Antarctica are examples. A fjord differs from most estuaries in its sheer, parallel walls, often extending far below the water surface, and in its many branches of similar form. Often shallow at the mouth, fjords are frequently very deep farther inland. Sognafjord (Norway) is 4,000 ft (1,220 m) deep and over 100 mi (160 km) long. Loch Moran, Scotland (1,017 ft/310 m), is a typical fjord but is separated from the sea. Norwegian fjords are noted for their grandeur.

Fjord

 

a narrow, winding, deep inlet in a mountainous coast. Its length is often dozens of times greater than its width. The sides of fjords are steep, even vertical, becoming less steep in the upper walls; the floor is highly irregular. The longest known fjord, Sognafjorden, is 204 km long, 1.5–6 km wide, and up to 1,208 m deep. Fjords are often separated from the open sea by a sill. They represent ancient erosion or tectonic valleys that underwent scouring by mountain glaciers, which deepened the floor, and that were subsequently inundated by postglacial transgression. Fjords are found only at high latitudes where Pleistocene glaciers formed or modern glaciers exist; they are found on the coasts of Norway, Spitsbergen, Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Novaia Zemlia, Taimyr, the Chukchi Peninsula, New Zealand, and Patagonia.

fjord

[fyȯrd]
(geography)
A narrow, deep inlet of the sea between high cliffs or steep slopes. Also spelled fiord.

fjord

, fiord
(esp on the coast of Norway) a long narrow inlet of the sea between high steep cliffs formed by glacial action
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the data they collected, the scientists estimated the heat absorbed by the fjord was about 100 megawatt per square meter, which "corresponds to a 2-megawatt wind turbine sending electricity to a large heater at the bottom of the fjord all year round.
All previous records, including this study, have shown the presence of MSAAW inside the fjords in subsurface layers.
Based in Oslo, Norway, Fjords Processing is a global leader in the provision of processing technology, systems and services to the upstream oil and gas industry.
All measurements of warming trends around Greenland have been made in the ocean off the coast, outside the fjords and far from the ocean-glacier interface.
For example, seabirds and marine mammals forage the glacial fjords for food.
1]-Fosen and Fjord 1 to supply propulsion systems for their five new double-ended ferries that will be built in Turkey.
For me, though, one of the advantages of Holland America's Norwegian fjords cruise was the amount of time offshore.
The highlight for me, though, was a trip around the scenic fjords of Oslo on a vintage Norwegian sailing ship, feasting on a haul of fresh shrimp for lunch.
Prices on MS Rotterdam's 14-night Fjords, Highlands & Ireland cruise, starting from Rotterdam on August 16, 2014 start from PS1,798 a head.
8220;We are very proud of our scenic fjords cruises, with our proud Norwegian heritage, and what better recommendation could there be for the best places to visit in our historic homeland than from the very people who live there.
Designed by Teknicraft of New Zealand and constructed by All American Marine in Bellingham, Washington, the new vessel will join two sister ships, the Aialik and Orca Voyager in the Kenai Fjords Tours fleet.
People always thought the circulation here would be simple: warm waters coming into the fjords at depth, melting the glaciers.