Flamininus


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Flamininus

Titus Quinctius . ?230--?174 bc, Roman general and statesman: defeated Macedonia (197) and proclaimed the independence of the Greek states (196)
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The Senate was determined to dip the wings of Macedonia as short as possible, and Flamininus and others were hoping to see Filip replaced by Demetrius, whom they expected to behave as a client king (104).
(11) Titus Quinctius Flamininus (228-174 a.C.): general romano e admirador da cultura grega, combate os macedonios e em 196 a.C.
his Scipio Africanus 202-3); Briscoe, "Flamininus and Senatorial Politics" 51 (cf.
Fabius Servilianus, was present at least part of the time in the Peloponnese as well, presumably to oversee the return to political quiescence, just as Flamininus had remained in Greece two years after the peace treaty with Philip in 196.
The lesson had long been learned in Greece that the cultivation of Roman favour could be a powerful weapon in the competition for political pre-eminence at home,(83) and the mass deportations which followed Pydna had shown just how efficiently political opponents could be removed after a war by means of allegations of unfriendliness toward Rome.(84) Fabius's acceptance of the role of adjudicator no more implies or exemplifies a permanent and legally defined subjection of Greece to Roman supervision after 146 than do Flamininus's jurisdiction in Phocis during the winter of 195/194, M.
Quinctius Flamininus displaying his cruelty and arrogance by killing a prisoner at his dinner table for the amusement of his mistress.(10) Zorzetti interprets this as another type of praetexta written in an invective mode with the purpose of exposing the arrogance of a Roman general by presenting him with the typical attributes of a tyrant.(11) This seems an unlikely idea because it would have been very difficult for anyone to stage such a piece anonymously.
Stage plays were performed at the funerals of Flamininus and L.
Quinctius Flamininus from taking Sparta; however, following Nabis' assassination, annexed Sparta, Messene, and Elis (192); elected Achaean strategus twice more (191, 189); his severity in dealing with Sparta (notably the abolition of Lycurgus' laws) earned him censure from Rome, which had established a protectorate over the city (198); twice more elected general (187, 183), he was killed in a skirmish with rebels from Messene (182).
Plutarch, "Flamininus," "Philopoemen." Parallel Lives.