Flamsteed number

Flamsteed number

(flam -steed) See stellar nomenclature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead it's known as 8 Leporis, according to its Flamsteed number. As popular as Flamsteed numbers are, they weren't actually used in Flamsteed's catalog or atlas, which were published after his death.
Having neither a Bayer Greek letter nor a Flamsteed number on atlases--not even a Struve ([SIGMA]) or other obvious double-star label--causes most observers to assume that it's insignificant.
Only 10 star systems within 17 light-years of Earth are bright enough to have a Greek letter or Flamsteed number, and 70 Ophiuchi is one of them.
Identify mode always offers objects by common name first, which is fine since you can view supporting text on the LCD that gives additional information such as a star's Bayer (Greek-letter) designation or Flamsteed number. If, on the other hand, you want to locate a star, you must call it up from SkyScout's internal catalog by its common name (or by its SAO or Hipparcos number, which few people would likely know offhand).
Between it and Dubhe (the star at the lip of the Big Dipper's bowl) is a 3.7-magnitude star that has no Greek-letter designation, only a Flamsteed number: 23 Ursae Majoris.
With a lack of Bayer stars to guide us, we'll turn to those that bear Flamsteed numbers, starting with the 6thmagnitude star 22 Leo Minoris.
The designations 30, 31, and 32 are Flamsteed numbers. John Flamsteed assigned higher numbers to stars with higher right-ascension values.
Several indices allow us to fix the time that Hipparchus's catalog was created to about 128 BC, and I was delighted to see that, around that time, Uranus could be found in the bottom right corner of a quadrilateral defined by that planet plus (Flamsteed numbers) 74, 76, and 82 Virginis.
The underlying problem is that so many Go To controllers offer no way to locate stars by their most common designations, such as Bayer letters, Flamsteed numbers, and Struve numbers.
For example, the three stars in the triangle bearing RY Draconis have Flamsteed numbers. But if you look at a star chart that labels numbered stars, you'll find that 32 Cam is completely out of order in the eastward progression of Flamsteed numbers across the constellation.
Stars & Planets is sprinkled with colored boxes containing terse but informative essays on subjects as diverse as white dwarfs, Johannes Hevelius, and Flamsteed numbers. It also offers detailed maps for special targets.
For each constellation, the stars are listed in order of their Bayer (Greek-letter) designation and then their Flamsteed numbers. The listings include all stars brighter than magnitude 5.5, as well as many binaries and variables and other stars of special interest.