Flandrian transgression

Flandrian transgression

[′flan·drē·ən tranz′gresh·ən]
(oceanography)
The rapid rise of the North Sea between 8000 and 3000 B.C. from about 180 feet (55 meters) below to about 20 feet (6 meters) below its present level.
References in periodicals archive ?
The wave-cut platform is thought to have developed about 4000-5000 years ago at about the climax of the Flandrian transgression when sea level was approximately one metre higher than it is today.
The latest sea level rise (the Flandrian transgression) commenced about 18,000 years ago and drowned most of the deflated remnants of the earlier dunes and marine sediments to deposit the modern (Holocene and Recent) carbonate muds, sands and, in places, coral reefs developed offshore.