xenon flash lamp

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xenon flash lamp

[′zē‚nän ′flash ‚lamp]
(electricity)
A flash tube containing xenon gas, which produces an intense peak of radiant energy at a wavelength of 566 nanometers when a high direct-current pulsed voltage is applied between electrodes at opposite ends of the tube.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Treatment of oral granulation tissue with the flashlamp pulsed dye laser.
In 10 hours, four flashlamp "Self-Cleaning" tests were carried out.
The acquisition is aimed at complementing Excelitas' high-reliability power systems offerings by gaining access to a broad suite of power systems such as capacitor-charging and flashlamp power supplies, electron beam and ion beam power supplies, HV DC and pulsed power supplies, X-ray generators and integrated X-ray sources.
Treatment with flashlamp pulsed dye laser is a safe and efficient treatment modality (9) (SOR: C).
He used a rod-shaped ruby crystal surrounded by a spiralling high-intensity flashlamp. The two ends of the ruby rod were coated with silver, with one end less reflective to allow some of the radiation to escape as a beam.
Fifty years ago this week, Theodore Maiman and Irnee D'Haenens turned up the juice on a flashlamp and electrical coil at the Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, Calif., and demostrated the world's first successful device for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, or laser.
On May 16, 1960, he and D'Haenens watched their oscilloscope as they increased the voltage to a flashlamp coiled around a small ruby rod.
This new technique builds on passive and flashlamp active thermography and is most applicable to aerospace applications.
With xenon flashlamp stripping, the light from a xenon laser is used to break the chemical bonds in the coating, with byproducts captured directly.
These modalities include high-intensity, narrow-band blue light (405-420 nm) to reduce inflammatory lesions; a broad-spectrum (430-1200 nm) flashlamp, which targets endogenous porphyrins produced by Propionibacterium acnes; a 1450-nm diode laser, which works by thermal destruction of the sebaceous glands; and the pulsed, nonablative erbium:YAG laser, which reduces the appearance of scars by stimulating neocollagenesis.
Another study demonstrated mixed results with the use of flashlamp pulsed dye laser in 10 patients with papulopustular rosacea with erythema and telangiectasia, in which only 2 patients showed significant improvement and 2 actually developed more lesions (Lasers Surg.
These shots successfully mapped laser efficiency across many operating parameters, including amplifier slab configurations and flashlamp input voltages, and demonstrated a single beam pulse energy of 26 kJ and peak power of 8 TW.