Flavoring Substances

Flavoring Substances

 

the general name given to certain substances that possess no nutritional properties and are used to improve the taste and aroma of food. Flavoring substances include spices, such as mustard, pepper, clove, bay leaf, caraway, dill, cardamom, ginger, vanilla, and cinnamon; food acids, such as acetic, citric, tartaric, and malic; and aromatic essences. When ingested with food, flavoring substances (especially spices) stimulate the olfactory and gusta-tory nerves, which in turn intensify salivation and secretion of gastric and pancreatic juices. Flavoring substances directly stimulate the mucous membrane of the digestive tract thereby increasing the flow of digestive juices, which improve the appetite as well as the digestion and assimilation of food.

References in periodicals archive ?
Those chemicals include nicotine, heavy metals, aldehydes, glycerin and flavoring substances, he explained.
The pentyl valerate and ethyl valerate esters of 3-methyl valeric acid are used as a food additive in the synthetic flavoring substances and adjuvant owing to its fruity flavors.
Betaine as one of the main flavoring substances in aquatic products, mainly tasted sweet and also contributes to umami (Kani et al., 2008), its taste threshold is 2.5 mg/g.
He noted that read-across has been used most extensively in the analysis of flavoring substances, which include 2,637 substances in the EU that the consumer is exposed to in relatively low amounts.
Today, there are nearly 7,000 flavoring substances sold and used in e-cigarettes.
Worldwide, flavoring substances are regulated and authorized for use by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) (Xu et al., 2013), and in Brazil by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) by Resolution RDC 2 of January 15th, 2007 (Brasil, 2007).
The flavoring substances of e-cig liquids may be safe to eat or drink but not to inhale.
FEMA has declared more than 2,600 flavoring substances GRAS.
The flavor materials include current materials cited in the FEMA GRAS lists through the GRAS 26 list and subsequent interim publications, the EU "Union" list of flavoring substances that can be used in food, and the materials in the publications of the CoE, as well as information from the Chemical Sources Association and users and suppliers of materials.
"Generally, flavor manufacturers have reduced the amount of diacetyl they use, and, in some instances, diacetyl has been replaced with other, similar flavoring substances," says John Hallagan of the Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association.
Seven flavoring substances are on the "wait and see" list, however.