flexor

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Related to Flexors: Hip flexors

flexor

[′flek·sər]
(physiology)
A muscle that bends or flexes a limb or a part.
References in periodicals archive ?
The psoas muscle is the largest and strongest muscle in your "hip flexor" group.
Plantar flexors' twitch contractile properties of the dominant leg were assessed using electrical muscle stimulation while the foot rested in an isokinetic dynamometer.
In infants, face involvements (42.85%) is more followed by flexor (28.57%), extensor (14.28%) and both flexor and extensor (14.28%).
The Steindler procedure is a classical reconstruction surgery to restore flexion of the elbow in upper type of brachial plexus injuries in which the origins of the wrist flexor muscle groups are transferred to the proximal direction [1].
The combination of posterior tibial nerve block with hamstring botulinum toxins was used in 3 (10.3%), and 2 (6.8%) patients received posterior tibial nerve block with finger flexor botulinum toxin injections.
Table 2 shows that the peak powers of the hip extensors, knee flexors, and ankle plantarflexors were all significantly greater than those of the hip flexors, knee extensors, and ankle dorsiflexors.
As per Brandsma, (6) torque angle measurement can objectively assess the degree of adaptive shortening of extrinsic finger flexors. (6) Torque angle measurement as per Brand is described as "windows into the mechanics of the joint".
It was also observed that the extensor muscles of the trunk have higher endurance level than the flexors. Of all the anthropometric variables, a positive significant correlation was only found between the FFMI and trunk extensor endurance (r=0.175, p=0.033), as presented in Table 2.
Stretching the hip flexors also helps both forms of spinal stenosis, since tight hip flexors will pull on the lumbar spine, which exacerbates low-back pain.
Two of the most important muscles needed for an active life are often the most neglected: the hip flexors. "The hip flexors are in action whenever you walk, climb stairs, or stand, or participate in almost any kind of activity, such as swimming, running, cycling, or yoga," says Daniel Salazar, PT, with UCLA Health.