frame rate

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frame rate

(graphics)
The number of frames of an animation which are displayed every second, measured in frames per second (fps). The higher the frame rate, the smoother the animation will appear but the more processing power and system bandwidth is required.

At less than 30 fps, the human eye can see the new pictures coming onto the screen.

frame rate

Video is captured and played back as a sequence of static (still) images, each image being one "frame." The frame rate is the number of these frames per second. For example, movie film is shot at 24 frames per second (fps), while NTSC video is shot at 29.97 interlaced fps, and high-definition video at 30 and 60 fps. Frame rate conversion is the duplication or reduction of frames in order to display the content on a video device with a different frame rate. See fps.
References in periodicals archive ?
Behavioural assessment of flicker fusion frequency in chicken Galius gallus domesticus.
Assessment of Psychomotor function by critical flicker fusion frequency: Correlation with age.
PSS: Perceived stress scale, SRT: Simple reaction time, CRT: Choice reaction time, CFFF: Critical flicker fusion frequency Table 2: Comparison of cognitive tests among males and females Parameters Males Females P value LDST 35.70[+ or -]5.646 43.23[+ or -]5.697 <0.0001 (*) WMS design 1.867[+ or -]1.907 3.300[+ or -]1.418 0.0016 (*) WMS spatial 3.300[+ or -]1.418 3.267[+ or -]1.388 0.927 MMSE 25.43[+ or -]2.515 27.67[+ or -]1.900 0.0003 (*) DSST 60.10[+ or -]9.707 24.60[+ or -]3.410 <0.0001 (*) (*) P<0.05 - statistically significant.
At the second stage ophthalmological status (acuity of vision and refraction) was estimated as well as functional (critical flicker fusion frequency -CFFF) electrophysiological (electrosensitivity threshold -EST; electrolabilityEL), phychophysiological (channel capacity- CC, visual information volume -VIV, visual information speed -VIS, efficiency of visual information analysis -EVIA) investigations were carried out [4, 5].
Negative relation between critical flicker fusion frequency and such parameters of visual perception as channel capacity of visual system and visual information processing may seem to be paradoxical because according to the canon of sensor physiology, the higher is the frequency characteristics of the communication channel, the higher its channel capacity [7].
To address this issue, electro-retinography was used to measure the changes in retinal light sensitivity, flicker fusion frequency, and spectral sensitivity in black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) subjected to rapid decompression (from 4 atmospheres absolute [ATA] to 1 ATA) and Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) exposed to 15 minutes of simulated sunlight.
Three separate procedures were conducted to test for treatment effects on visual function: responses to increasing light intensities (V-log I response curves), flicker fusion frequency, and spectral sensitivity.
When measured by means of the flicker fusion frequency (FFF), this effect is present only when normal eye movements are permitted.
Flicker fusion frequency experiments involved presenting the eye with square pulses from a flickering stimulus light, generated by cycling a computer-controlled electromagnetic shutter in the light path, for 2 s at a given frequency with a 50:50 light/dark ratio, and recording the corresponding ERG (see Frank, 1999).
(2008) reported a progressive increase in critical flicker fusion frequency following 10 day yoga training program.
However, Moeller and Case (1995) measured the critical flicker fusion frequency at threshold light intensities, which is difficult to compare between species because (1) the threshold sensitivity of a crustacean eye measured using the ERG technique varies considerably from preparation to preparation (pers.
The flicker fusion frequency was measured with 10 ms flashes in dark adapted crabs, as well as in crabs adapted to and tested in 11.65 [[micro]watts]/[cm.sup.2] fluorescent light.