floatplane

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seaplane

seaplane, airplane designed to take off from and alight on water. The two most common types are the floatplane, whose fuselage is supported by struts attached to two or more pontoon floats, and the flying boat, whose boat-hull fuselage is constructed with the buoyancy and strength necessary to land and float on water. Amphibians may be of either of these types with the addition of landing gear, enabling them to take off from and alight on either land or water. The first practical seaplane was constructed and flown by the American Glenn H. Curtiss in 1911. The seaplane developed rapidly in the 1920s and 30s, and for a time it was the largest and fastest aircraft in the world. Because the flotation structures offered greater resistance to the air than wheel-type landing gear, seaplanes were until recently less efficient and slower for any given horsepower requirement than land-based aircraft. However, developments in small and retractable flotation structures have eliminated that inefficiency and have made possible supersonic jet-powered seaplanes.
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floatplane

floatplane
An airplane that has floats to enable it to land and take off from water.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
For landlubber pilots, seaplanes involve learning an intriguing combination of sailing and flying, for once on the water, a floatplane or flying boat's handling characteristics are disorientingly unfamiliar.
It also adopted FAA's Capstone Program and became the first floatplane carrier in Alaska to install state-of-the-art glass cockpit avionics navigation equipment throughout its fleet.
Some of these areas don't permit floatplane access, meaning boat-floats to reach better areas.
Since you can reach Stehekin only by ferry, floatplane, or foot, my wandering teens will be without their wheels.
Equipped with global positioning systems, time-depth recorders, and radio transmitters, researchers track seals from boats, kayaks, and floatplanes. And they need every single tool they've got.
Unlike the smaller floatplanes that land on water, the huge Empire flying boats were more like boats that could fly, even hoisting the Ensign flag when they were on the water.
Having survived the previous day's duel, she found herself under the guns of four floatplanes from the very cruiser she had unsuccessfully torpedoed.
While calling in Juneau, several passengers chose to visit a glacier area, via floatplanes. This was a Princess-sponsored tour.
Floatplanes, horses or other riding/packing stock are great options for reaching remote environs.
During the Second World War, Norseman floatplanes were used extensively by the Allied Forces for a variety of utility missions.
Squadrons of helicopters and floatplanes buzz through the skies en route to prized backcountry destinations.
The presence of six fleet carriers and several other vessels that carried floatplanes with the First Air Fleet would enable a system of air patrols to thoroughly cover huge swaths of ocean for ships and planes that might detect it.