Floral Clock


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Floral Clock

 

a group of herbaceous plants set out on a small area whose flowers open and close at definite times of the day (with accuracy of ½ to 1 hour). Thus, the floral clock makes it possible to determine the time with approximate accuracy. The first floral clock was laid out by the Swedish naturalist C. Linnaeus at Uppsala in the 1720’s. It started between 3:00 and 5:00 A.M., when the flowers of Trapogon pratensis opened, and ended at midnight, when the flowers of Celenicereus grandiflorus opened. The opening and closing of the flowers occur on clear and sunny days; in overcast or rainy weather these phenomena are almost imperceptible or are greatly delayed. The opening and closing of flowers depend on many other conditions, including geographic location and the time of sunrise and sunset. For this reason, different flowers must be used in different localities; laying out a floral clock in a particular region requires preliminary observations over a period of many years.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Donations towards the upkeep of the clock can be made at: https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/morpethfloralclock https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/morpethfloralclock A brief history of the Morpeth Floral Clock The time piece was presented to the borough of Morpeth by James Fairbairn Smith of Detroit in 1972.
He ambitiously called for "Floral calendars" charting circannual developments of botanical species to be "completed every year in every province," and "Floral clocks" functioning "under any climate" "to be worked out according to the watches of the plants, so that anyone can make calculation of the hour of the day without a clock or sunshine." (8) Advocating the Horologium Florae or Floral clock, Linnaeus refers to the phenomenon in which some flowers "watch," or open and close, at specific hours of the day and night, prompting him to theorize that one could arrange certain flowers into the face of a clock and know the time simply by perceiving which flowers are blooming at a particular moment (fig.
Miracle Garden opened its doors to the public in November 2013 with attractions such as a UAE floral flag, a floral clock, large structures of sunflowers, seven flower hearts, seven stars and huge flowers made with 3D art design.
Yet another unmissable attraction is a 15-metre floral clock made out of real plants and flowers with designs that change according to the season.
Floral Clock, Niagara Parks, Queenston, Ontario, Canada The Floral Clock does more than keep time - it keeps changing.
KEEN gardener Peter Gibson has turned back the floral clock at what was one of the North East's grandest railway stations.
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Eye on the time - Floral Clock - pounds 25.00 from www.j-me.co.uk If you're forever in a hurry and never have time to catch a glance of yourself as you rush out of the door, let this multi-purpose, time-telling machine help.
EYE ON THE TIME - Floral Clock (pounds 25, from www.j-me.co.uk) If you're forever in a hurry and never have time to catch a glance of yourself as you rush out of the door, let this multi-purpose, time-telling machine help.
"The Floral Clock" is a whimsical piece that revels in language for its own sake, listing flower names--"brilliant azure Wild Succory," "pale Common Nipple-wort," and "the golden star / of the Lesser Celandine"--as much for the pleasure of letting them roll off the pen and the tongue, one suspects, as for the purpose of exploring Linnaean natural science.
Laura Ashley also has a pretty floral clock, pounds 35.