Florimel

Florimel

feared “the smallest monstrous mouse that creeps on floor.” [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
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The creation of the false Una and false Florimel take on new resonances in this context, and Eggert ultimately sees The Faerie Queene as both positing orthodox views about reproduction, and revealing their inadequacy.
She becomes the man-devouring serpent/woman of Keats' "Lamia," a Circe, a serpent in place of a woman, a false Florimel and a ghoul, as well as, of course, the unfeeling marble statue of the book's title.
It is introduced by Spenser in The Faerie Queene as the girdle of Florimel.
6) and that is subsequently lost by Florimel is related to the same thematic wordplay.
Next, he heard on Saturday, that the true Florimel is just on the wing for London: "a week or 10 days" - he says:(3) - I hope, he lies: but there's no knowing.