Fluellen


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Fluellen

pedantic Welsh captain and know-it-all. [Br. Lit.: Henry V]
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Armin would have played Fluellen, and this comic actor developed this accent into a bit of a trademark.
Several previous studies (Chambers, 1998; Fluellen, 2003; Hinnant et al, 1999; Kim & Michael, 2005) stress the importance of developing creative thinking teaching skills.
But Henry later asks Fluellen, "Is it fit this soldier keep his oath [to respond to a challenge to duel]" (4.7.119-20)?
Delyth, who lives in Caswell Bay, Gower, Swansea, has been a significant figure on the Welsh and international folk scene since the 1980s, playing with groups including instrumental trio Aberjaber and lately in a duo with her violinist daughter Angharad called DnA, and with the Fluellen Theatre Company.
Tony Bell and Chris Myles express the moral side of soldiery as Fluellen and the Duke of Exeter, both showing an aptitude for some genuine comedy.
Yn Act 4, Golygfa 7 mae Fluellen yn troi at y Brenin ac yn dweud "If your majesty is remembered of it, the Welshmen did good service in a garden where leeks did grow, wearing leeks in their Monmouth caps, which your majesty know to this hour is an honourable badge of the service; and I do believe your majesty takes no scorn to wear the leek upon Saint Tavy's day."
[If] that's the kind of boy you're talking about, his colors are blue and gold." A former athletic rival happily greets Jackie's brother Mack (Joel Fluellen), himself a talented athlete who finished second to Jesse Owens in the 100-meter run at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin.
The king accepts the challenge and requests Williams's gage, meaning, as we will see, to relegate it to a proxy, Fluellen. Taking the king's gage, Williams vows, "If ever thou come to me and say, after tomorrow, 'This is my glove,' by this hand I will take thee a box on the ear" (4.1.213--16).
The hermeneutic in this case had been identified by Richard Levin in an article published in PMLA the year before Battenhouse published "Falstaff as Parodist and Holy Fool" Levin used several essays without identifying them by author or title (though one was Battenhouse's 1946 essay on Measure for Measure) to illustrate what Levin called "Fluellenism;' referring to the argument Fluellen makes in Henry V, comparing the English king to Alexander the Great.
With Colin Ryan (Henry V), Patrick McCarthy (Canterbury, Bardolph, King of France, Erpingham, Warwick), Timur Kocak (Cambridge, Bretagne, Fluellen),Jonathan Hopkins (Glouchester, Scroop, the Dauphin), Peter Galman (Pistol, Orleans, MacMorris), James Rana (Ely, Bedford, Governor of Harfleur, Bourbon, Bates), Beth Ann Leone (Boy, Katherine), Colin Colfelt (Westmorland, Grandpre, Jamy, Williams), Paul Sugarman (Grey, d'Albret, Gower, Burgundy) and others.
Lloyd sees Fluellen in Henry V and Hugh Evans in The Merry Wives of Windsor as Welshmen who are losing touch with their roots, Hugh Evans willingly while he makes a reasonably successful attempt to fit into English town life, and Fluellen reluctantly as he struggles to assert the position of Wales while earning his living in an English-speaking world.