Overload

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Related to Fluid overload: pulmonary edema

overload

[′ō·vər‚lōd]
(civil engineering)
A load on a structure that is greater than that for which the structure was designed.
(electronics)
A load greater than that which a device is designed to handle; may cause overheating of power-handling components and distortion in signal circuits.
(geology)
The amount of sediment that exceeds the ability of a stream to transport it and is therefore deposited.

Overload

In electricity, more than a normal amount of electric current flowing through a device or machine, or a load greater than the device is designed to carry.

overload

1. A load on a structure in excess of that for which it was designed.
2. Electric current, power, or voltage in excess of that for which a device or circuit was designed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, our subjects with intradialytic hypertension and higher metabolic acidosis state had simultaneously less urine output and increased arterial stiffness markers, which also reflect fluid overload apart from vascular injury, as it was explained above.
(40) Most patients with HFpEF and HTN will have some degree of fluid overload and, therefore, should receive a diuretic.
Therefore, it is suitable for precise adjustments of fluid removal rate in the management of fluid overload in different diseases.
Reliance on these fluid management features while using the Symphion System still requires careful consideration of an individual patient's risk factors for fluid overload, as well as team vigilance during the procedure, but they may afford an additional layer of protection against complications associated with fluid overload.
Glycine 1.5% relatively Hypoosmolar (Osmolality 230mosm/lit), Nonelctrolyte solution intravastes into vascular tree in excessive amounts causing Hyponatremia, hypoosmolar state, fluid overload and may lead to pulmonary edema.
It's also unclear how to provide it, since there are concerns about fluid overload from intravenous administration and swallowing and choking from oral intake.
Assessment of fluid responsiveness -- the ability of the circulation system to increase cardiac output in response to volume expansion -- is essential to guide fluid therapy and optimize preload.(1) Too little fluid administration can result in low perfusion in peripheral tissue, but too much fluid administration can result in patients failing to respond to any amount of volume expansion,(2,3) as well as fluid overload postoperatively.(4,5)
In this study of 53 patients there were no cases of complications or fluid overload, and diuresis was maintained at a level higher than 1 cc/k/h.
Patients with fluid overload from excessive fluid intake are often in hypotonic states.
One has to be extremely careful in case of children because fluid overload has its own complications which can be severe in children and at times it can be fatal.
It is less prone to infection and has a lower risk of fluid overload than intravenous delivery, though there may be localised oedema and erythema at the site of injection.
Serious complications, such as pulmonary and cerebral edema associated with fluid overload and hyponatremia can occur during surgery.