flurry


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flurry

Hunting the death spasms of a harpooned whale

flurry

[′flər·ē]
(meteorology)
A brief shower of snow accompanied by a gust of wind, or a sudden, brief wind squall.
References in periodicals archive ?
Looking globally, Flurry also notes that as well as huge growth in the smartphone and tablet user base over the five years that it has been gathering data, it has also seen a continuing rise in the average number of apps consumers use on a daily basis.
Flurry also believes that, while smartphone activations are usually activated four times as much as tablets, Christmas Day 2012 saw more tablets activated than smartphones, with Apple's iPad and iPad mini, as well as Amazon's Kindle Fire HD the main players.
App downloads as expected were affected by the massive surge in new activated devices, with Flurry reporting a 112 percent increase in downloads on Christmas compared to the previous 20 days.
According to experts, the short-lived flurry does not mean we should brace ourselves for a second big freeze.
"This year sees the percentages slightly more in favour of a white Christmas, and for Wales, the higher ground over Mid and North Wales could well see some snowfall, but there is a possibility lower levels will see a flurry or two.
Together, the buildings comprise approximately 6.5 million square feet of prime office space in a market where investor appetite for trophy assets has led to a flurry of billion dollar sales and a seemingly endless demand for product.
The seductive quest to unify quantum theory and general relativity has led to a flurry of work for the past 25 years on an idea known as string theory.
And over the last few years, a flurry of new discoveries has revealed what these creatures were like.
The custom mixing industry has seen a flurry of activity within the past year.
18, despite a flurry of activity prior to its break over the holidays.
Among the most familiar are Homer, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Langston Hughes, and Alan Seeger, who at age 28 wrote "I Have a Rendezvous With Death," moments before he fell in a fatal flurry of machine-gun fire.