flying buttress

(redirected from Flying buttresses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

flying buttress:

see buttressbuttress,
mass of masonry built against a wall to strengthen it. It is especially necessary when a vault or an arch places a heavy load or thrust on one part of a wall. In the case of a wall carrying the uniform load of a floor or roof, it is more economical to buttress it at
..... Click the link for more information.
.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

flying buttress

A characteristic feature of Gothic construction in which the lateral thrusts of a roof or vault are carried by a segmental masonry arch, usually sloping, to a solid pier or support that is sufficiently massive to receive the thrust.
See also: Buttress
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

flying buttress

[¦flī·iŋ ′bə·trəs]
(architecture)
A buttress connected by an arch to the building it supports.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flying buttress

flying buttress: A
A characteristic feature of Gothic construction, in which the lateral thrusts of a roof or vault are taken up by a straight bar of masonry, usually sloping, carried on an arch, and a solid pier or buttress sufficient to receive the thrust.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flying buttress

a buttress supporting a wall or other structure by an arch or part of an arch that transmits the thrust outwards and downwards
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
For the non-technical reader, Flying Buttresses are not migrating geese from Norway, or a decades old rock/pop band, but a method of offsetting and therefore spreading the pressure of, any large and heavy building.
The McLaren design team has created a shape of beauty highlighted by details such as the rear flying buttresses that increase downforce as well as adding grace, and complex door tendons that direct additional air to cool the mid-mounted V8 engine
They jump on some storks that are at Tuileries Garden, and they fly-through the giant Ferris Wheel, over Seine River, through the flying buttresses at Notre Dame, and over a sidewalk cafe, until they finish by circling the model of the Statue of Liberty that sits in the middle of the Seine.
Built from 1160 in flamboyant Gothic style, they give you a close-up view of flying buttresses, spires and roofs.
But we know the island is no cathedral, there are no flying buttresses
Flying buttresses holding up the sky, the twelve arches of the Pont
The great cathedrals of northern France are wonders of architectural rationalism, with a precisely proportioned balance of verticals and horizontals laid out on a coherent, unified plan and those high vaults and serried arcades supported by external ranks of flying buttresses. They are calculated essays in structural unity, so different from the deliberately irregular exterior of, say, Salisbury with its several projecting transepts, where, as Nikolaus Pevsner put it, 'on a virgin site the designer could do exactly what he thought best, and the outcome differs in every respect from the French ideal of Chartres, Reims and Amiens'.
It developed in the 14th century as a shell form that was inserted into existing Norman or Romanesque structures as an alternative to the Gothic arch, whose loading paths required either pinnacles or flying buttresses [or both].
From the cathedral's flying buttresses I could almost imagine the Hunchback of Notre Dame shouting: "No cameras, no flashlight...
Also, in the same sculptural vein, Laurel's students really excelled during their medieval unit when they discussed cathedrals, flying buttresses and stained glass--and then were asked to create a sculpture by designing their own gargoyles.
From 35 stories above ground, in a five-metre-wide tree named Adventure, he describes "a vertical Eden filled with mosses, lichens, spotted salamanders, hanging gardens of ferns, and thickets of huckleberry bushes, all growing out of massive trunk systems that have fused and formed flying buttresses."
Visually, they seem to anchor the bridge at strategic mathematical points and, rather like a cathedral's flying buttresses, to collect opposing forces and carry them earthwards.