Pteropus

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Related to Flying-fox: Malayan Flying Fox

Pteropus

 

(fruit bats or flying foxes), a genus of bats of the suborder Megachiroptera. These bats are relatively large; for example, the body length of the kalonga (Pteropus vampyrus) reaches 40 cm, with a wingspread of 1.4 m. Tails are absent, the nose is pointed, and the ears are small. The head is generally similar to that of a dog or fox. There are approximately 40 species, distributed in southern and southeastern Asia, New Guinea, Australia, Oceania, and Madagascar. They feed on fruit juices and pulps, as well as on flowers that are rich in nectar and pollen. In some places these bats are harmful garden pests. Their meat is edible. The name “flying foxes” is sometimes used for all the Megachiroptera.

References in periodicals archive ?
The research found that the significant presence of temporary and seasonal flying-fox roosting sites within the buffer range provides a strong basis for detailed cluster analysis and regression models.
Description of the status of flying-fox roosting sites.
Working with a case study of Australian flying-foxes, I aim to enliven our ethical sensibility toward the goodness that is being evicted from the world through human impacts as they directly and indirectly break into and diminish the lives of others.
It is now possible to turn to flying-foxes and to consider their participation on ongoing creation, their offerings and blessings, their narratives of participatory life.
In Australia, the largest male flying-foxes weigh about one kilogram and have wingspans of up to 1.5 metres (Hall and Richards, Flying Foxes 1-3).
Although the evidence is clear that flying-foxes prefer the Myrtaceae flowers and forest fruits with which they are co-evolved, the clearing of native vegetation and its replacement with commercial fruit crops has left them little choice.
Like much of earth life today, flying-foxes inhabit zones of increasing conflict and terror.
In contrast to the violence that exists between some humans and flying-foxes, there is a fantastic love story of the co-evolution of flying-foxes and their preferred trees and shrubs.
In Australia, blossoming takes place sequentially, and flying-foxes are readily able to know when trees start to bloom hundreds of kilometres away from where they are camping, and to fly off to find the nectar; humans do not know how they do this (Eby, "The Biology and Management." 24).
We had recently received two Little Red flying-foxes into care off separate barbed wire fences.
(57.) Alan Leishman, 'The History of Grey-Headed Flying-Foxes in the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney', 2007, http://www.