focus group

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focus group

(product)
An event where market researchers meet (potential) users of a product to try to plan how to improve it.
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focus group

a research method in which selected groups of people participate in focused discussion on a research issue. Groups may meet on more than one occasion. The method is seen as having some advantages over single-person interviews in allowing a more extended working out of individual and collective viewpoints. As well as a method used in sociology, it is also widely used by political parties and in MARKET RESEARCH.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
The process of planning, organizing and conducting focus group discussions.
In focus groups, a moderator uses a scripted series of questions or topics to lead a discussion among a group of people.
Families and healthcare professionals are invited to attend separate informal focus groups to help decide if there is enough demand for a new support service at the Trinity Holistic Centre, sited at The James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough.
Developing Questions for Focus Groups. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
The four proposals for change the focus groups were to discuss were confidential, HWNZ said.
Prior to beginning the activity, the project team collected baseline data on students in the capstone course by using a survey to assess students' familiarity with focus groups, their confidence in their skills related to the activity, and their opinions on social media and conflict.
And qualitative means a quality or characteristic, some kind of value.) Focus group research works to discover the "why" of consumer activity.
According to Phillips and Stawarski (2008) focus groups are particularly helpful when qualitative information is needed about a program's success.
Formal or informal focus groups can be employed to satisfy valuation assignments requirements.
Inappropriate touching was the most commonly reported behavior in the study, mentioned in 38% of focus groups by 7% of participants.
Topping the list of limitations is that focus groups are all art, no science.