federal

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federal

1. of or relating to a form of government or a country in which power is divided between one central and several regional governments
2. of or relating to a treaty between provinces, states, etc., that establishes a political unit in which power is so divided
3. of or relating to the central government of a federation
4. (of a university) comprised of relatively independent colleges
5. a supporter of federal union or federation

Federal

1. characteristic of or supporting the Union government during the American Civil War
2. a supporter of the Union government during the American Civil War
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
foederal constitution fully adequate to the exigencies of the
(390) Many Federalists countered that standing armies were "essentially necessary" not because of the threat of "an European war"--"[t]his I think is not very probable, provided the Foederal Government is established," wrote one Federalist--but because of the "peculiar situation of the United States," surrounded by Indian nations?
33, he said that it would be federal usurpation if Congress attempted "to vary the law of descent in any State" or "abrogate a land tax imposed by the authority of a State." (19) "[T]he business of the foederal constitution was not local, but general," Wilson said before Independence Hall, such that the Convention saw no need to specify when a jury trial would be required in noncriminal cases.
The European treaties and settlements were foedera and the American union was foederal, derived from Latin foedus, for covenant or alliance.
require being mentioned"); Foederal Constitution, PA.
Resolved, That a state cannot, under the constitution of the United States, be made a defendant at the suit of any individual or individuals, and that the decision of the Supreme Foederal Court, that a state may be placed in that situation, is incompatible with, and dangerous to the sovereignty and independence of the individual states, as the same tends to a general consolidation of these confederated republics.
(Richmond), April 23, 1788, reprinted in 9 DOCUMENTARY HISTORY, infra note 344, at 753, 754 (stating that under the Constitution, debtors "can no longer hope for paper money"); Commentary, The Protest of the Minority, Who Objected to Calling a Convention, for the Purpose of Adopting the Foederal Constitution, PA.