Fohn wind

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Fohn (Föhn) wind

Fohn (Föhn) windclick for a larger image
Warm and dry winds descending on the leeward side of the mountain. The air falling to the floor of an adjacent valley or plain after blowing across the mountaintop warms up adiabatically. Thus, this wind is warmer than the surrounding air. In Europe, it is known as a Fohn or Föhn wind. In the United States and Canada, along the eastern slopes of the Rockies (i.e., leeward side), the Indian name Chinook is used.
foil
i. A form of metal rolled into a very thin sheet with a thickness less than 0.006 in (0.15 mm).
ii. The spanwise-trailing-edge members forming an integral part of a compound wing.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
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The temperature might have been affected by a phenomenon known as the Foehn Effect, a dry and warm down-slope wind that occurs to the lee of hills or mountains.
Explaining why it is going to be so warm, Cardiff-born Channel 4 presenter Liam Dutton said: "The potential to break February records will depend on the Foehn effect happening.
The high was the result of the foehn effect which often hits the region on Taiwan's southeast coast, sometimes even when a typhoon lashes the rest of the island.
ON a North Wales mountainside, Charlotte Bennett is producing awardwinning wines, competing with the best in the world - with the help of something called 'the foehn effect.'.
ITV weather man Ross Hutchinson puts this down to the 'Foehn effect' The Met Office describes the Foehn effect as: "When air passes over mountains, the valleys on the downwind side (or 'lee' side) commonly experience strong and gusty downslope winds accompanied by abrupt warming and drying.
Recently, we have been enjoying the warm benefits of wind travelling towards Britain from the south west, producing what is known as the 'Foehn effect.' The Met Office describes the Foehn effect as: "When air passes over mountains, the valleys on the downwind side (or 'lee' side) commonly experience strong and gusty downslope winds accompanied by abrupt warming and drying.
In contact with the mountain, the air mass rises and dries generating a foehn effect on the province of Oum el Bouaghi.
Weather phenomenon the Foehn effect, which can produce significantly higher temperatures on the sheltered side of mountains, is expected to hit North Wales today, meaning temperatures in the low 20s.
THE Foehn Effect is blamed by weather- men for the freak condition being experienced by parts of Scotland.
N a North Wales mountainside, Charlotte Bennett is Oproducing awardwinning wines, competing with the best in the world - with the help of something called 'the foehn effect.'.