Font-de-Gaume


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Font-de-Gaume

 

a cave with paleolithic paintings in the department of Dordogne in southern France. Font-de-Gaume was discovered in 1901 and investigated by D. Peyrony, H. Breuil, and other archaeologists. Approximately 200 depictions of bisons, horses, mammoths, deer, and “huts” are etched and painted in various colors on the cave walls. The relief of the walls was used to achieve a three-dimensional effect. The cave paintings date from the Magdalenian culture (15,000–11,000 B.C.)

REFERENCE

Capitan, L., H. Breuil, and D. Peyrony. Peintures et gravures murales des cavernes paléolithiques: La Caverne de Font-de-Gaume. Monaco, 1910.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
To begin to write into what I experienced in such caves as Lascaux, Combarelles, and Font-de-Gaume entailed mounting a research project, from scratch, and undertaking a poetic investigation--a "saturation job" as the poet Charles Olson called it--that ended up spanning twenty five years.
I knew that the Font-de-Gaume cave was at the far end of this rock formation and that the path leading up to the cave's entrance could be glimpsed right before our road dead-ended into a road that, were one to turn right, would pass by the trail leading to Font-de-Gaume's entrance.
Studying the faded, polychromatic bison in Font-de-Gaume I noticed how the dorsal lines are often determined by an undulating crevice in the rock, giving one the impression that the animal was in some mysterious way already half-submerged there.