dropfoot

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dropfoot

[′dräp‚fu̇t]
(medicine)
A condition in which the foot drags along the ground and gives the person a characteristic shuffling gait, caused by the failure of the muscle responsible for raising the foot during walking as the leg is swung forward.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
After his treatment completed, he was discharged home; however, he complained about difficulty in ambulation and decreased strength of bilateral lower extremities with bilateral foot drop. The patient was, then, admitted to our clinic.
As a consequence, this type of foot drop which only occurs occasionally or worsens as a result of prolonged exercise and is likely to be a sign of motor fatigability may be difficult to diagnose in short duration walking tests.
An 81-year-old female was admitted to our ED with a 12-hour history of left-sided foot drop. Her motor strength was normal throughout the upper and lower extremities, except for weakness in the left ankle and toe dorsiflexors.
Foot drop is defined as weakness of the foot and ankle dorsiflexion due to debility of the anterior tibialis, extensor halluces longus and extensor digitorum longus muscles.
Are there any conservative stretegies I can try at home prior to seeing a professional for the foot drop?
However, the foot drop did not resolve, reflecting permanent, motor sciatic nerve damage.
And recently, he was named to the company's TeamUP, a 13-member national squad for people with foot drop paralysis, all of whom wear the ToeOFF or another one of the company's devices.
She continues to have foot drop, irregular gait, and right hip pain.
'ere is also a ve foot drop either side of the path and in places they are inches away one side of the river and the other side is the moats.
Suzie said: "Having known many of Little Hearts Matter's members since they started their complex journey living with only half a heart, I wanted to do something different to support them hence the challenge of a 100 foot drop, which is nothing compared to the challenges the children and their families face every day."
All the patients who were admitted for foot drop correction from 1999 to 2010 are included in this study.