foot-pound

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foot-pound,

abbr. ft-lb, unit of workwork,
in physics and mechanics, transfer of energy by a force acting to displace a body. Work is equal to the product of the force and the distance through which it produces movement.
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 or energyenergy,
in physics, the ability or capacity to do work or to produce change. Forms of energy include heat, light, sound, electricity, and chemical energy. Energy and work are measured in the same units—foot-pounds, joules, ergs, or some other, depending on the system of
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 in the customary English gravitational system; it is the work done or energy expended by a force of 1 pound acting through a distance of 1 foot. It is equal to 1.356 joulesjoule
, abbr. J, unit of work or energy in the mks system of units, which is based on the metric system; it is the work done or energy expended by a force of 1 newton acting through a distance of 1 meter. The joule is named for James P. Joule.
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. The term foot-pound is also used to designate a unit of torquetorque,
in physics, that which tends to change the rate of rotation of a body; also called the moment of force. The torque produced by rotating parts of an electric motor or internal-combustion engine is often used as a measure of its ability to do useful work.
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 that is sometimes called the pound-foot to distinguish it from the energy unit. A force of 1 pound applied 1 foot from and perpendicular to the direction to an axis of rotation produces a 1 foot-pound (or pound-foot) torque at the axis.
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foot-pound

[′fu̇t ¦pau̇nd]
(mechanics)
Unit of energy or work in the English gravitational system, equal to the work done by 1 pound of force when the point at which the force is applied is displaced 1 foot in the direction of the force; equal to approximately 1.355818 joule. Abbreviated ft-lb; ft-lbf.
Unit of torque in the English gravitational system, equal to the torque produced by 1 pound of force acting at a perpendicular distance of 1 foot from an axis of rotation. Also known as pound-foot. Abbreviated lbf-ft.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has 395 horsepower and the same 400 foot-pounds of torque as the 2.7-liter engine but without the turbos.
Ten JSB Exact RS pellets averaged 830 fps, which is 20.55 foot-pounds. The spread was large, though.
* 24 1/2 inches--Easton 371 A/C/C stuffed with a Beman 75-90 (32 inches and 751 grains) and experimental 95-grain two-blade Rocky Mountain Titanium head from my 91-pound Hoyt UltraTec XT 2000 (90 foot-pounds KE and 233 fps).
At a standard velocity of 975 fps it churns up 421 foot-pounds, and is available as an even hotter +P running at 1,050 foot-seconds.
Over the next few years, ZF will change to 6-speed automatics for all high-torque (from 221 to 550 foot-pound) applications.
Horsepower is improved from 210 to 280 via a new four-cam cylinder head, which replaces the SOHC heads, and torque is 285 foot-pounds. This is a serious hot-rod Lincoln.
It has 270 horsepower and 295 foot-pounds of torque.
At that speed and weight, at 245 fps, your arrow leaves the bow with 49.97 foot-pounds of kinetic energy and .408 slugs of momentum.
The vehicle is available with a choice of three engines, the base 2.0-litre turbocharged inline four-cylinder that produces 265bhp and 295 foot-pounds of torque; a new 3.6-litre normally aspirated V6 that produces 335bhp and 284 foot-pounds of torque and an all-new 3.0-litre twin-turbo V-6 that generates 404bhp and 400 foot-pounds of torque.
With an operating weight of 13,779 pounds and a bucket force of 9,731 foot-pounds, the 58.6-net-hp compact excavator is designed to dig to depths of 13 feet 6 inches.
Through the technology of long-stroke pistons, these behemoths--both breakbarrels and underlevers--generate as much as 30 foot-pounds through sheer physics.
The quick acceleration from the Escape's 184 foot-pounds of torque at a low 2,500 rpm isn't typically found in non-turbos.