flooding

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flooding

[′fləd·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Filling of ditches or covering of land with water during the raising of crops; rice, for example, must have occasional flooding to grow properly.
(chemical engineering)
Condition in a liquid-vapor counterflow device (such as a distillation column) in which the rate of vapor rise is such as to prevent liquid downflow, causing a buildup of the liquid (flooding) within the device.
(petroleum engineering)
Technique of increasing recovery of oil (secondary recovery) from a reservoir by injection of water into the formation to drive the oil toward producing wellholes. Also known as waterflooding.
(psychology)
A behavior therapy for phobias and other problems involving maladaptive anxiety, in which anxiety producers are presented in intense form (real or imagined) and continued until the stimuli no longer produce disabling anxiety.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Flooding

 

in military affairs, an obstacle created to compel the enemy to abandon an area he has occupied, to hinder his advance, to disrupt bridges and ferrying and landing operations, or to interrupt communications in the rear of the enemy. For flooding an army may use a water reservoir on a river or a tributary; a lake, a river, or a canal with a spillway that regulates water supply; or a sea or a gulf if the water level is higher than the land and is separated from it by dunes or dikes. Flooding was used in World War I and World War II.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

flooding

1. The stratification of different-colored pigments in a paint film.
2. Introducing water, by gravity, into the backfill surrounding a pipe in order to compact the backfill.
3. A temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of normally dry land areas resulting from (a) the overflow of inland or tidal waters, or (b) the unusual and rapid accumulation of runoff of surface waters from any source.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flooding

Various denial-of-service techniques that saturate a critical resource, leading either to system failure or to the exclusion of legitimate access. See email bomb, Fraggle attack, smurf attack and SYN-flood attack.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in the web circumstances, different levels of forced exposure can occur.
Unlike traditional media, the WWW makes it possible for the audience to be exposed to advertisements at many different degrees of forced exposure. Cho (1999) classified advertising exposure on the WWW into two types: involuntary exposure to banner ads and voluntary exposure to target advertisements.
H1: A higher degree of forced exposure in a banner ad will yield a higher level of advertising perception.
H2: Higher degrees of forced exposure in the banner ad will yield a higher clickthrough rate.
However, in the web circumstance, different levels of forced exposure can occur due to innovative presentation technologies.
In other words, the higher the level of forced exposure, the more negative are the effects of advertising on consumers.
H3.1: A higher degree of forced exposure will yield a more unfavorable attitude toward the banner ad.
H3.3: A higher degree of forced exposure will yield a lower purchase intention.
For example, while attention levels were not affected by clutter (possibly due to the forced exposures), persuasion and ad likability declined with increases in clutter.

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