displaced person

(redirected from Forced migrant)
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displaced person:

see refugeerefugee,
one who leaves one's native land either because of expulsion or to escape persecution. The legal problem of accepting refugees is discussed under asylum; this article considers only mass dislocations and the organizations that help refugees.
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displaced person

a person forced from his home or country, esp by war or revolution
References in periodicals archive ?
Recipients are forced migrants who are prohibited from working within the UK, and unable to tap into statutory student funding.
Forced migrant labor is one of the more common forms of slavery and indentured servitude where the worker takes an opportunity to migrate to a perceived better environment only to find themselves trapped under the control of the wealthy person who paid for their transport (Batstone, 2007).
A growing body of research, albeit conducted under very difficult and curtailed circumstances due to the political climate in host societies, demonstrates that thousands of refugees, forced migrants, and asylum seekers remain in the Middle East with limited access to work, access to education, or recourse to public funds.
The article describes eight main types of conflict-induced forced migration in southeast Myanmar, determined largely by forced migrants' coping mechanisms in the context of hardship and abuse.
Often the psychological or emotional issues counselors are trained to address are not the most pressing concerns for a forced migrant. This reality can influence the treatment focus and type of intervention.
Despite the differences in their condition, the two groups are united among themselves and with each other by their objective situation as forced migrants of globalisation.
According to him, there were 72 million forced migrants worldwide in 2012, 3.5 million of whom were stateless.
These episodes of disappointment and distress render his experience of flight a narrative of the misfortunes of a sympathetic protagonist faced with the "facts of cruelty, failure, frustration and loss." (63) In this excerpt, fear is used as a metaphor to show how the forced migrant's ancestral home "has created a new order of uncertainty in social life, an order that legitimizes responses of extreme violence and terror." (64)
Berhman argues that the negative perceptions of the refugee today are intimately linked to the romanticization of the forced migrant in an earlier era.
This has led to widespread public resentment of the Iraqi forced migrant population.
H said while African Union Member States are celebrating this very important day, they should equally be concerned about the global perspective and the pressure put on national and local economies by forced migrants moving between countries and within countries' territorial boundaries.