forensic odontology


Also found in: Medical.

forensic odontology

[fə′ren·sik ‚ō·dän′täl·ə·jē]
(forensic science)
A subspecialty of forensic medicine which focuses on the identification of deceased persons by dental examination, or of perpetrators by bite marks.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is important to indicate that this study consider the concept "bite marks" based in the American Board of Forensic Odontology (ABFO) definition: "A physical alteration or representative pattern recorded in a medium caused by the contact of the teeth of a human or animal" (American Board of Forensic Odontology, 2018).
'We don't tend to talk about how forensic odontology is used in books or films, but teeth are composed of one of the hardest tissues in your body-enamel - and therefore can last a very long time and withstand a variety of assaults.
Addressing the ceremony, Prof Javed Akram said the newly emerging science of forensic odontology could help identify the charred: bodies or beheaded human skulls, he added.
Basic Dental Sciences will cover community dentistry, oral biology, oral pathology, forensic odontology, dental pharmacology and therapeutics, Dental materials and Behavioural Sciences.
(33) The current practice of forensic odontology provides a perfect storm of conditions for such bias--examiners have wide discretion in their decision-making and are often aware of the identity of the suspect.
Key Words: Forensic Odontology, Forensic Dentistry, questionnaire, Peshawar, teeth, identification, age estimation, gender discrimination, ante-mortem, post-mortem, records, racial determination.
In this context, the science of dentistry is also used in human identification; known as forensic dentistry or forensic odontology. (1) Human characteristics such as fingerprints, DNA, and dental records are the most frequent identification techniques in forensic medicine.
Forensic odontology has been used in three main areas:
During the seventh decade of the 20th century, two Japanese scientists, Tazuo Suzuki and Yasuo Tsuchihashi, examined lip print pattern variations in a sample of 1.364 persons at the Department of Forensic Odontology at the Tokyo University.
154, 154 (2013); Hall & Player, supra note 20, at 38; Mark Page et al., Context Effects and Observer Bias --Implications for Forensic Odontology, 57 J.
Furnari has extensive experience in lecturing and work in forensic odontology and has a master's degree in Biosecurity and Disaster Preparedness.
With the above background, the present study was aimed to analyze and compare the bite marks of males and females via a novel indirect computer-assisted method using ICD and elucidate its application in forensic odontology.
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