Fort Beauséjour

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Fort Beauséjour

(bōsāzho͞or`), N.B., Canada, near Amherst, N.S. Built by the French between 1751 and 1755 to command Chignecto isthmus between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, it was captured (1755) by British and American troops under General Monckton and was renamed Fort Cumberland. It is now Fort Beauséjour–Fort Cumberland National Historic Site.

Beauséjour, Fort:

see Fort BeauséjourFort Beauséjour
, N.B., Canada, near Amherst, N.S. Built by the French between 1751 and 1755 to command Chignecto isthmus between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, it was captured (1755) by British and American troops under General Monckton and was renamed Fort Cumberland.
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, N.B., Canada.
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Synopsis: Both an adventure-laced captivity tale and an impassioned denunciation of the marginalization of Indigenous culture in the face of European colonial expansion, Douglas Smith Huyghue's "Argimou" (originally published in1847) is the first Canadian novel to describe the fall of eighteenth-century Fort Beausejour and the expulsion of the Acadians.
To Lawrence, Fort Beausejour, on the north side of theMissaguash River across from his own Fort Lawrence, was a constantreminder that British authority in Nova Scotia was extremely tenuous, amatter of gentlemen's agreements and governmental lethargy.
Sequestered in Fort Beausejour was the mystifyingAbbe Le Loutre, the heart of French resistance in Nova Scotia.Even his name is mystifying, at least to me: uneloutre is an otter, a very strange name for the son of a Paris papermaker.
It may well be that Lawrence extended Shirley's originalplan of evacuating the northern French to include the Acadians in orderto diminish Le Loutre's power and remove a potential fifth columnfrom his back as he stared across the river at Fort Beausejour.Edward Cornwallis, governor of Nova Scotia, called Le Loutre "agood for nothing Scoundrel as ever lived." And when, in June1755, the British crossed the river and took the fort, Le Loutre wasfound to have escaped.
The village was burned to the ground more than a few times in various wars by colonial surrogates of the British government from either Boston or Halifax, and the Acadians moved across the marsh to Fort Beausejour in 1750.
Cornwallis' immediate successor did not consider the Acadians a threat, but he returned to England for medical treatment after only a year, never to return and in his place was appointed a professional soldier, Charles Lawrence, who knew the Acadians only from his experience in the no-man's land on the Chignecto Isthmus where France had built Fort Beausejour as a riposte to the founding of Halifax, and LeLoutre was forcing the Acadians in the region to relocate to French-controlled territory.
Before winter, the colonial militia that had captured Fort Beausejour would return home and Lawrence would be left with 250 redcoats to control 13,000 Acadians.
Many fought at Fort Beausejour and were taken prisoner when the garrison surrendered to a force led by Colonel Robert Monckton.
To Lawrence, Fort Beausejour, on the north side of the Missisquash River across from his own Fort Lawrence, was a constant reminder that British authority in Nova Scotia was extremely tenuous, a matter of gentlemen's agreements and governmental lethargy.
Sequestered in Fort Beausejour was the mystifying Abbe Le Loutre, the heart of French resistance in Nova Scotia.
It may well be that Lawrence extended Shirley's original plan of evacuating the northern French to include the Acadians in order to diminish Le Loutre's power and remove a potential fifth column from his back as he stared across the river at Fort Beausejour. Edward Cornwallis, governor of Nova Scotia, called Le Loutre "a good for nothing Scoundrel as ever lived." And when, in June 1755, the British crossed the river and took the fort, Le Loutre was found to have escaped.
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