Fort Donelson

See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
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Fort Donelson

(dŏn`əlsən), Confederate fortification in the Civil War, on the Cumberland River at Dover, Tenn., commanding the river approach to Nashville, Tenn. After capturing Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River (Feb. 6, 1862), General Ulysses S. Grant, on Feb. 12, marched his men 12 mi (19 km) to Fort Donelson, which he proceeded to invest. Although assisted by gunboats, his army was repulsed by the Confederates. The Confederates were thrown back by the Union forces on the next day, after attempting to retreat. The fort fell on Feb. 16, opening the way for the advance on Nashville. Fort Donelson National Battlefield and National Cemetery is there (see National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
, table).

Donelson, Fort:

see Fort DonelsonFort Donelson
, Confederate fortification in the Civil War, on the Cumberland River at Dover, Tenn., commanding the river approach to Nashville, Tenn. After capturing Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River (Feb. 6, 1862), General Ulysses S. Grant, on Feb.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
Early in the war, Logan had a horse shot out from under him at the Battle of Belmont, Mo., and suffered serious wounds at the Battle of Fort Donelson, on the Kentucky-Tennessee line.
He describes schooling, business, and culture in the mid-19th century, the transmission of knowledge through mechanicsAE institutes and agricultural fairs, and the development of railroads; the war and volunteer engineers who participated, their roles in battles at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, and Island No.
Grant National Historic Site, Fort Donelson National Battlefield, Stones River National Battlefield, Obed Wild and Scenic River, Manhattan Project National Historical Park, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Blue Ridge Parkway, Ninety Six National Historic Site, Congaree National Park, Charles Pinckney National Historic Site, Fort Sumter National Monument
This feat, and his blunt demand for the unconditional surrender of Fort Donelson, earned him quick national celebrity.
Their courtship and romance, which came to light in a rare and unpublished series of letters, forms the basis of Gene Barr's "A Civil War Captain and His Lady: Love, Courtship, and Combat from Fort Donelson through the Vicksburg Campaign".
Although Sergeant Samuel McIlvaine of the 10th Indiana was fighting to deny "the right of any portion of the people of the United States to sever, or rive in twain, and destroy this government, which stands out to the rest of the world as the polestar, the beacon light of liberty & freedom to the human race," he did nothing when "three or four slave hunters" entered his regiment's camp after Fort Donelson and dragged away two or more blacks who "had mixed with the Negro cooks and waiters and were thus endeavoring to effect their escape to the North." They 'had counted on being protected in the regiment," but McIlvaine and his compatriots, who were so concerned to be a beacon light of liberty and freedom, allowed them to be disarmed and taken "without molestation on our part."
Federal troops occupied the city shortly after Fort Donelson fell in February 1862.
In 1862, the Civil War Battle of Fort Donelson in Tennessee ended as some 12,000 Confederate soldiers surrendered; Union Gen.
As a result of his victories at Fort Donelson in February 1862 and Shiloh in April, Grant had been made commander of the large Department of the Tennessee, which included parts of the states of Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Illinois.
A retired Air Force and Federal Express pilot, Tennessee-based Knight enjoys researching history and has written four previous books, including two others in the Civil War Sequicentennial Series on the battles of Franklin and of Fort Donelson. His third contribution to the series focuses on the battle that took place at Pea Ridge--some 75 miles from Knight's hometown in northwest Arkansas--a two-day battle in March 1862 that was key in determining who would control northwest Arkansas and southwest Missouri for the rest of the war.
An amateur general, Pillow lent his name to the fort, but his ego outstripped his talent, and he soon humiliated himself by fleeing a Union attack on Fort Donelson. After a series of skirmishes, Union troops took over Fort Pillow in April 1862 and occupied the installation for the next two years, until Forrest's attack.
Most memorable, however, were the stories they came away with, thanks to ranger-led tours along the Natchez Trace Parkway in Mississippi, Fort Donelson National Battlefield in Tennessee and Kentucky, and Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Ohio.

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