Fort Mims

Fort Mims,

temporary stockade near the confluence of the Tombigbee and Alabama rivers. It was the scene of a massacre (Aug. 30, 1813); William WeatherfordWeatherford, William,
c.1780–1824, Native American chief, b. present-day Alabama, also called Red Eagle. In the War of 1812 he led the Creek war party, stirred by Tecumseh, against the Americans. On Aug.
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 led a Native American force in the killing of c.500 whites.

Mims, Fort:

see Fort MimsFort Mims,
temporary stockade near the confluence of the Tombigbee and Alabama rivers. It was the scene of a massacre (Aug. 30, 1813); William Weatherford led a Native American force in the killing of c.500 whites.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regular contributor Ken Dunn of Spring Valley, California brings history to these pages with a commemorative article on the 100th anniversary of the battle of Fort Mims during the Creek War.
(17) By far the most pivotal battle of 1813, though, was at Fort Mims in present-day Tensaw, Alabama, during which the Red Sticks avenged earlier losses.
Jackson, a reserve general at the time, gathered a group of Tennessee Volunteers in the early winter of 1813 and began a march into Alabama to avenge losses at Fort Mims. He engaged the Red Sticks in several locations along the Coosa and Tallapoosa River corridor, where his troops routinely impeded the Red Sticks at every turn.
government's plans for expansion or its "federal road" through Creek country in 1813 but in the Red Sticks' vengeance at the Fort Mims battle ("massacre") that same year.
O'Brien begins with a dramatic description of the horrid massacre at Fort Mims in August 1813, when Red Stick Muscogee (Creek) Indians slaughtered over two hundred inhabitants of the fort.
Then, on August 30, 1813, a group of Red Sticks attacked Fort Mims near the Florida panhandle and killed hundreds of men, women, and children.
In a careful Montague-Capulet touch, she is cast as the daughter of a frontiersman attached to the Fort Mims garrison;(7) and the latter, known to his former Creek kindred as the "WHITE WOLF," as one of the few survivors of the massacre, thereby also continues to figure importantly--by some contemporary evaluations, too importantly--as the vengeful antagonist.(8)
(7) To complicate matters of naming and actual historical association further, as would have been well known to Alabamians of the era, Daniel Beasley had also been the real name of the commander taxed with the neglect of defensive preparations at Fort Mims that made the bloodbath inevitable.
30, 1813, he led an attack on Fort Mims, a temporary stockade near the confluence of the Tombigbee and Alabama rivers.
Fort Mims was in the Tensaw District, thirty-five miles north of the old French trading settlement of Mobile.
For unknown reasons Dixon Bailey, a half-blood Creek militia officer at Fort Mims, was warned about approaching Creek war parties, did nothing to secure the garrison.
DEADLIEST BATTLES OF THE WAR OF 1812 (1812-1815) KILLED IN BATTLE PLACE ACTION DATE Fort Mims Alabama 533 Aug 30, 1813 Raisin River (Frenchtown) Michigan 300 Jan 22, 1813 Lundy's Lane Ontario 171 Jul 25, 1814 Fort Meigs Ohio 110 May 5, 1813 Chrysler's Farm Ontario 102 Nov 11, 1813 Queenstown Heights Ontario 90 Oct 13, 1812 Essex v.

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