Fort Necessity

See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 49,075 (19,868) Mountain and coast scenery.
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Fort Necessity,

entrenched camp built in July, 1754, by George Washington and his Virginia militia at Great Meadows (near the present Uniontown, Pa.). He retired there when he learned that the British fort at the forks of the Ohio (the site of Pittsburgh) had been captured (and renamed Fort Duquesne) by the French. In late May, 1754, a French patrol had been defeated and its leader killed in a surprise attack led by Washington near Great Meadows. A large French reprisal force attacked Fort Necessity and forced Washington to surrender on July 4. He secured easy terms from the French and departed for Virginia with all his surviving men and their baggage. These two skirmishes marked the opening of the last of the French and Indian WarsFrench and Indian Wars,
1689–1763, the name given by American historians to the North American colonial wars between Great Britain and France in the late 17th and the 18th cent.
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. Near Fort Necessity National Battlefield (see National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 49,075 (19,868) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
, table) is the grave of the British general Edward Braddock.

Necessity, Fort:

see Fort NecessityFort Necessity,
entrenched camp built in July, 1754, by George Washington and his Virginia militia at Great Meadows (near the present Uniontown, Pa.). He retired there when he learned that the British fort at the forks of the Ohio (the site of Pittsburgh) had been captured (and
..... Click the link for more information.
.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Brian Mast has worked for the National Park Service as an interpretive ranger at such parks as Fort Necessity National Battlefield and Flight 93 National Memorial.
Thought the war began with a French victory (in which young Lieutenant Colonel George Washington was soundly defeated at Fort Necessity), it swiftly blossomed into a financial albatross around imperial France's neck.
Instead, 20-plus years before independence, the Fourth was best known for the routing of Washington's troops from Fort Necessity by hostile French and Indian fighters at the start of the eponymous war.
(Washington claimed that the French were spying on his party and preparing to launch their own ambush.) Aware that the French would retaliate, Washington swiftly began constructing defenses, which he labeled Fort Necessity. On July 3, 1754, the French finally attacked, killing a third of Washington's soldiers while only suffering three dead of their own.
The opening battle of the French and Indian War was fought on July 3, 1754 at Fort Necessity, Pennsylvania, but not all of its participants were locals.
From Maryland, the Road swings west through southern Pennsylvania, with a stop at the Fort Necessity National Battlefield, site of the first battle of the French and Indian War.
Following George Washington's defeat at Fort Necessity the previous year, imperial authorities dispatched one of their top commanders, General Braddock, to regain control of the frontier.
Washington's men constructed Fort Necessity as a defensive measure.
Branded an "assassin" by the French, Washington in turn was attacked and forced to fall back on Great Meadows, where he threw up a rough palisade he called Fort Necessity. It was overlooked by a small ridge that allowed the French to riddle the place with musket fire.
The album opens with a photo of what is described as "Fort Necessity," the home of F.E.
For instance, few Americans know that George Washington commanded a Virginia militia force (3) and that he surrendered to a French-Indian force at Fort Necessity in 1754.