Fort Stevens State Park

Fort Stevens State Park


Location:Off US 101, 10 miles west of Astoria.
Facilities:174 full hookup campsites, 302 electrical hookup campsites, 19 tent campsites, 15 yurts, hiker/biker camp, showers, restrooms (é), picnic area, picnic shelters, hiking trails, bike trail, bridle trail, beach access, boat ramp, wildlife observation platforms, interpretive exhibits, playgrounds, nature/visitor center, store, museum.
Activities:Camping, boating, fishing, swimming, windsurfing, hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, wildlife viewing.
Special Features:From the Civil War to the end of World War II, Fort Stevens was the primary military defense installation of the three-fort Harbor Defense System at the mouth of the Columbia River. Related sites at the park today include a historic shipwreck and a historic military area.
Address:100 Peter Iredale Rd
Hammond, OR 97121

Phone:503-861-1671
Web: www.oregonstateparks.org/park_179.php
Size: 3,809 acres.

See other parks in Oregon.
References in periodicals archive ?
For a long time, as in a lot of waterfront towns, the best place to be on a pretty day in Astoria was either at the beach (you can see the Pacific meet the Columbia at Fort Stevens State Park) or along the river, where sea lions sun themselves on the docks.
A tidal inlet on the north end of Fort Stevens State Park collects anything as large as tires down to granules of microplastic hidden on and under driftwood and the rolling dunes north of the South Jetty.
The photo was taken at Fort Stevens State Park near Astoria.
OREGON Sunset Beach near Fort Stevens State Park, Hammond; 503/861-3170
The guide includes 10 maps that cover the 382-mile Coast Trail, which runs from Fort Stevens State Park near Warrenton to Pistol River State Scenic Viewpoint near Brookings.
Across the river at Oregon's Fort Stevens State Park, tour an artillery battery commissioned by Abraham Lincoln, then ride 9 miles of paved bike trails or walk miles of sand beach.
Only Fort Stevens State Park near Astoria has more campsites.
At Fort Stevens State Park near the Columbia River, brooding forest suddenly gives way to grassy dunes.
Fort Stevens State Park. The wreck of the Peter Iredale.
On Wednesday, that part - a rusting, barnacle encrusted piece of the British ship's bow - will have been at what is now Fort Stevens State Park for exactly 100 years.
In fact, several museums and organizations on both the Oregon and Washington sides of the Columbia, including Fort Stevens State Park and the Clatsop County Historical Society, are hosting events this weekend through next weekend to recognize the anniversary and hold talks about marine safety and the dangers of crossing the bar.
Under cross-examination from defense attorney Roman Silberfeld of Los Angeles, Kitzhaber acknowledged there are other shipwrecks on public beaches - such as the remains of the Peter Iredale, which drifted onto the beach near what is now Fort Stevens State Park in 1906 and is now a tourist attraction.

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