Fort Sumter


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Sumter, Fort:

see Fort SumterFort Sumter,
fortification, built 1829–60, on a shoal at the entrance to the harbor of Charleston, S.C., and named for Gen. Thomas Sumter; scene of the opening engagement of the Civil War. Upon passing the Ordinance of Secession (Dec.
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.

See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
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Fort Sumter,

fortification, built 1829–60, on a shoal at the entrance to the harbor of Charleston, S.C., and named for Gen. Thomas SumterSumter, Thomas,
1734–1832, American Revolutionary officer, b. near Charlottesville, Va. He served with Edward Braddock (1755) and John Forbes (1758) in their expeditions against Fort Duquesne in the French and Indian War, and later he fought against the Cherokee.
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; scene of the opening engagement of the Civil War. Upon passing the Ordinance of Secession (Dec., 1860), South Carolina demanded all federal property within the state, particularly the forts of Charleston harbor—Fort Sumter, Fort Moultrie, and Castle Pinckney. On Dec. 26, 1860, Major Robert Anderson removed his U.S. army command of about 100 men from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, a stronger defensive site. Gov. F. W. Pickens of South Carolina had the other two forts, along with the Charleston arsenal, seized, and upon the refusal of President James Buchanan to order Anderson's evacuation, had guns trained on Fort Sumter. On Jan. 9, 1861, an unarmed merchant ship sent to reinforce the fort's garrison was driven back by the South Carolina forces. Pickens's subsequent formal demand for the fort's surrender was declined, and South Carolina prepared to reduce Anderson's stronghold. Pickens hoped to secure the fort before Abraham Lincoln took office, but in Feb., 1861, the newly organized Confederate government assumed the state's part in the controversy, sending Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard to command Charleston. On Apr. 8, 1861, Pickens received Lincoln's notice that a naval expedition would be sent to provision the beleaguered garrison. On Apr. 11, Beauregard called for Anderson's surrender, but the demand was again refused. After a 34-hour Confederate bombardment, begun at 4:30 AM on Apr. 12, Anderson accepted terms, and on Apr. 14 the garrison departed with the honors of war. Although no one was killed, the action made manifest the belligerent spirit in both the North and the South. In 1863, Union naval attacks on the fort were thoroughly repulsed. After Sherman forced the evacuation of Charleston, the U.S. flag was again raised over the fort by Anderson on Apr. 14, 1865. Fort Sumter became a national monument in 1948 and was designated a national historical park with Fort Moultrie (which had been part of the monument) in 2019. See National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
, table.

Fort Sumter

site of opening blow of Civil War (1861). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 486–487]
See: Battle

Fort Sumter

a fort in SE South Carolina, guarding Charleston Harbour. Its capture by Confederate forces (1861) was the first action of the Civil War
References in periodicals archive ?
Lincoln Goes to War, 2006), the recruitment effort following Fort Sumter was enhanced by widespread unemployment in the Northeast.
CASE STUDY: FORT MOULTRIE AND FORT SUMTER NATIONAL MONUMENT National Park Service Mission and Goals "The National Park Service will protect, preserve, and foster appreciation of the cultural resources in its custody and demonstrate its respect for the peoples traditionally associated with those resources through appropriate programs of re-search, planning, and stewardship." (5)
TODAY FEAST DAYOF ST ZENO 1861: The American Civil War, a conflict between 23 northern states and 11 southern states, began with the siege of Fort Sumter in South Carolina.
Eleven anti-abolition riots erupted in Northern cities between 1859 and the 1861 attack on Fort Sumter in South Carolina, which began the Civil War.
Commemorating the start of the American Civil War, the Images of America series has produced a beautifully illustrated volume exploring the firing on Fort Sumter. After an introduction that incorporates several primary sources to explain the buildup to the first shot, the rest of the volume chronicles the largest collection of published Fort Sumter images.
The Civil War began on 12 April 1861, when Confederate troops fired on Fort Sumter in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina.
North Carohnian Catherine Edmonston, who witnessed Union attempts to resupply Fort Sumter, wrote in her diary, "The North is sowing the wind; see that ere the next generation she does not reap the Whirlwind!"
Six days before the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter started the war, champion Planet was beaten in 4m heats in New Orleans.
On September 8, 1863 the daring Preston lead an operation against Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbour.
When Confederate forces fired on Fort Sumter in April 1861, thousands of patriotic southerners rushed to enlist to fight for the Confederate cause.
Here's a sampling of topics: the finding of Neolithic drawings at Catalhoyuk in Turkey is a fraud; ancient Egyptian obelisks were raised by a hitherto undiscovered technology; the Greek city-states were "democratic" by our modern American definition; Pushyamitra Sunga, a Hindu ruler in the second century BCE, was a great persecutor of the Buddhists; the Mayan kingdoms died out from disease; Columbus intentionally underestimated the circumference of Earth in order to get funding; Lincoln maneuvered the South into firing the first shot at Fort Sumter; Sacco and Vanzetti were innocent; and, the final topic of the set: it was reasonable for George W.

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