Fortunate Isles


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Fortunate Isles

or

Isles of the Blest,

in classical and Celtic legend, islands in the Western Ocean. There the souls of favored mortals were received by the gods and lived happily in a paradise. Belief in the islands long persisted, and the Canaries and the Madeira Islands were sometimes identified with them.

Fortunate Isles

(Happy Isles) otherworld for heroes favored by gods. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 861]
See: Heaven
References in periodicals archive ?
THE Fortunate Isles cruise continues until mid-April 2001.
The Canaries, the Fortunate Isles of myth, lie about 100km off the southern coast of Morocco just above the Tropic of Cancer.
It was because of this lovely weather that the Romans christened them the Fortunate Isles.
Islands have fascinated authors and explorers since the dawn of history, and the notion of the Fortunate Isles or "Isles of the Blest" (as they are sometimes called) occupied a prominent place in classical and Celtic legends.
The first chapter explores the significance of Dante's sole and quite brief reference to the Fortunate Isles, found in Monarchia II.
In the second chapter Cachey reflects on passages devoted to the Fortunate Isles in Petrarca's De vita solitaria and canzone 135 of the Rime sparse and in Boccaccio's De Canaria, seeing in the reactions of these two authors to the inhabitants of the Canaries "due giudizi divergenti" (87).
The penultimate chapter somewhat tediously reviews the presentation of the Fortunate Isles by numerous sixteenth-century historiographers, including Pietro Martire di Anghiera, Niccolo Scillacio, G.
The improving Vadsalina looks the form horse, but there is also plenty of confidence behind Fortunate Isles and Destare, who were both winners at Compiegne last time out.
The Romans called them the Fortunate Isles because of their warm climate all year round.
Closer to the coast of Africa than Spain, it's easy to see why the Greeks called these the Fortunate Isles.