Fortunate Isles


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Fortunate Isles

or

Isles of the Blest,

in classical and Celtic legend, islands in the Western Ocean. There the souls of favored mortals were received by the gods and lived happily in a paradise. Belief in the islands long persisted, and the Canaries and the Madeira Islands were sometimes identified with them.

Fortunate Isles

(Happy Isles) otherworld for heroes favored by gods. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 861]
See: Heaven
References in periodicals archive ?
Fortunate Isle 3.00 Market Rasen The Fortunate Isles was one of the terms given to the resting place for the souls of heroes and worthy mortals in Greek and Celtic mythology, akin to the Elysian Fields.
I had the great fortune to win a competition last year and won an all expenses paid, 12 day, luxury cruise to the Fortunate Isles.
The topoi of the naked peoples of the fortunate isles are not only used to promote or justify slavery and colonial expansion but also to criticize and condemn them as in Montaigne's Des cannibales, conspicuously absent from Wallace's discussion; the Padovan umanisti, the notaries linked to the rise of humanist techniques, cannot simply be elided with their Genovese counterparts engaged not with law and philology but with mercantile accounting; and most importantly perhaps, Petrarch cannot stand for humanism writ large, a complex, multifaceted, fragmented array of movements, groups, and developments.
Since she was a child, Pierrette has been gifted by the goddess Ma with a vision of Minho, the King of the Fortunate Isles. In the scenario, she would journey there when she was of age, flirt with him, and be his bride.
I boarded at Tenerife for their Fortunate Isles cruise.
The Canaries, the Fortunate Isles of myth, lie about 100km off the southern coast of Morocco just above the Tropic of Cancer.
It was because of this lovely weather that the Romans christened them the Fortunate Isles.
Islands have fascinated authors and explorers since the dawn of history, and the notion of the Fortunate Isles or "Isles of the Blest" (as they are sometimes called) occupied a prominent place in classical and Celtic legends.
In Chapter 5, 'The Fortunate Isles', we leave Italy via a discussion of Chaucer and the Marques de Santillana; the former had translated a Petrarchan sonnet without keeping its form and its introspective quality, while the latter successfully brought the Petrarchan mode into Spanish.