founder effect

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founder effect

[′fau̇n·dər i‚fekt]
(genetics)
The overrepresentation of a specific allele at one or more loci in a new population that arises from a small number of individuals whose small gene pool may be unrepresentative of the parental population initially or as a result of the ensuing genetic drift.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since mtDNA is maternally inherited, this may imply that the female rhinoceros founding population has behavioral restricted movements within an ecological range.
(2007) assigned "Nova Scotia" or "Ontario" as the possible sources of the founding population, based on personal communication, and Fasanella et al.
As far as men are concerned, previous research on Madagascans, specifically on the Y sex chromosome (passed from father to son), indicates that the males of this founding population were also from Southeast Asia, though they don't know how many there were.
The original founding population was diverse and generalized, both morphologically and genetically, and its descendent populations, affected by changing environments, produced variant characteristics and newly derived traits.
Introduced populations often act as natural experiments in that regard, particularly when founding population size is known, as well as demographic trends since founding.
is older and may have been the founding population for A.II.
A relatively small founding population was fruitful and multiplied--aided in the 19th century by polygamy, which allowed husbands to have more than one wife.
Accordingly, the distinct linguistic and cultural groups emerged after the expansion and radiation of the founding population throughout North, Central, and South America.
Finns are a good example: Finland had a small founding population, so some mutations are found in Finns more frequently than in other Europeans.
Recently colonized areas would be expected to show less genetic diversity than areas with long-established populations, particularly if the effective size of the founding population was low.
Nielsen's study, which argues for one founding population, finds that about 13,000 years ago, Native Americans split into two groups, one that spread through North America and continued into South America, and another that remained in North America.
While their North American populations may have overlapped for only a few generations, members of the Dorset and Thule cultures shared genetic similarities that point to a common, founding population in Siberia.