fundamental interaction

(redirected from Four forces)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

fundamental interaction

[¦fən·də¦ment·əl ‚in·tər′ak·shən]
(particle physics)
One of the fundamental forces that act between the elementary particles of matter.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These four forces, then, are changing the influences around ICT departments, Lalchandani said.
Those features are designed to give readers a substantial yet concise, plain-English exploration of four forces that shaped the economy in 2011: economic adjustment and adaptation, the labor market, widespread uncertainty, and monetary policy.
So where will you be in 20507 is there any way you can respond to the four forces that Smith thinks will shape the future?
"We have got four forces from the West Midlands Region working together with other agencies and our main focus is targeting criminals using ANPR technology which is linked to police and other databases.
Even more interesting, she points to recent mathematics by cosmologist Lawrence Krauss of Case Western Reserve University showing that life could still have formed even if one of the four forces in our universe was changed.
Yet in string theory, simple behaviors of strings--for instance, how they vibrate and whether they break or form loops--generate not only all four forces but also all the elementary particles.
As these four forces of change play out, how are professional communicators being prepared?
Information focuses on the impact of four forces, including regulatory and political, economic and pricing, markets and demand, and science and technology.
These four forces constitute what might be called the "20th-century model for flight." Today, we have conquered these forces.
More specifically,Merseyside experienced fewer burglaries than the other four forces,fewer car thefts than most,and a full 20% less violence than in Greater Manchester and West Yorkshire.
Under a short lead-in text at the top--"From the action of four forces on 103 elements in four dimensions, we get..."--are catalogued hundreds of entities in the real and imagined universe: "All the insects in a rickety old cowshed; London 1853 AD; A 200 cm long bar of 10 cm diameter polished steel; A ballerina rests..." One encounters objectivity, poetry, humor, drama, and schmaltz in equal measure, but in Tyson's work such impurity remains part of the point rather than something to be avoided at all costs.