Fouta Djallon


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Fouta Djallon

or

Futa Jallon

(both: fo͞o`tä jälôN`), highland region, c.30,000 sq mi (77,700 sq km), central Guinea, W Africa. Largely a rolling grassland (average alt. c.3,000 ft/910 m), the region is grazed by cattle of the Fulani. The Niger, Senegal, and Gambia rivers rise there. Since the 18th cent. it has been a stronghold of Islam.

Fouta Djallon

 

a system of stepped plateaus in West Africa. Elevations range from 300–400 m on the Atlantic coast to approximately 800–1,000 m in the central Fouta Djallon; some massifs reach an elevation of 1,400–1,500 m (Tamgué Massif 1,537 m). The plateaus are composed chiefly of sandstones and argillites, with intrusions of basalts, dolerites, and gabbros. Annual precipitation reaches 1,500 mm. Many of West Africa’s rivers rise in the Fouta Djallon, including the Gambia, the Bafing (the upper course of the Sénégal River), and tributaries of the upper Niger; the local inhabitants call Fouta Djallon “father of waters.” The rivers flow through deep valleys and divide the plateaus into sections. In the past, evergreen equatorial rain forests grew on the region’s red and red-yellow ferralitic soils; they have now been entirely cut down. The local population engages in livestock raising and land cultivation, the principal crops being millet and rice.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Authors wish to thank the Water and Mountains Team, Forestry Department, FAO and the staff of the Fouta Djallon Highlands Integrated Natural Resources Management Project (EP/INT/503/GEF), FAO, for the financial support provided to the study.
Building on traditional cooperation among women for sustainable rural development in the Fouta Djallon Highlands.
Thus the idea of making the journey from the river's source in the remote Fouta Djallon Highlands of Guinea, through Senegal and The Gambia while creating a modern-day account of the communities and tribes that live along one of Africa's last major free flowing rivers--took on an element of urgency.
Guinea has four main ethnic groups: Peuhl (Foula or Foulani), who inhabit the mountainous Fouta Djallon; Malinke (or Mandingo), in the savannah and forest regions; Soussous in the coastal areas; and several other ethnic groups (Gerze, Toma, etc.) in the forest region.
Regional Fouta Djallon Highlands Integrated Natural
Since science says we are all descendants of ape, victims of the Fula tribe descendants may shuttle to their pre-historic ancestors and borrow some measure of villainy and violence to counter the animals from Fouta Djallon highland.