Foxe


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Foxe

John. 1516--87, English Protestant clergyman; author of History of the Acts and Monuments of the Church (1563), popularly known as the Book of Martyrs
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Foxe's hook for obtaining the cooperation of these lost souls is asking they relay their ties to the living by creating an original poem.
Cooper said toxicology on Foxe is pending, and the crash remains under investigation.
According to Foxe, Button sailed in May 1612 (4) with 18 months' provisions, in two ships: Resolution, under his own command, and Hudson's own ship Discovery, under Captain Ingram (Christy 1894, xxix & 164 fn2).
Foxe's Book of Martyrs is similar to the Martyrs Mirror in its massive size and long view of martyrological history; but it also provided an example of a book whose illustrations could shape the Protestant mind visually as well as textually.
Starting with the latter, Susan Wabuda offers an enlightening account of the manuscript sources for Foxe's Acts and Monuments, which often traveled far and wide, and of the impressive array of variant versions produced by the printer John Day.
A renewed interest in religious controversy has been to the benefit of John Foxe, whose magnum opus is the subject of King's erudite monograph, Foxe's "Book of Martyrs" and Early Modern Print Culture.
Evoking Foxe, Adelman explains how a new definition of sacred nationhood based on land boundaries replaces an older "Jewish" construction defined by blood and ancestry, but is also dangerously open to alterity.
In documenting the sufferings of the English Protestants, Foxe wanted to record for all time how determined men and women had witnessed the truth of reformed Christianity with their lives, and show how the Church of England had grown out of the blood of martyrs in the same way that the primitive Church had done.
King rightly points out that Foxe was not an autonomous author, but rather an "author-compiler" who worked with his publisher and many others to stitch together primary documents such as prisoners' narratives of their examinations and eyewitness accounts of executions.
One of his contemporaries, Sir Thomas Elyot, in The Boke of the Gouernour (1531), chose to follow in Cicero's footsteps, attributing to the faculty an ethical power to shape the future direction of humanity: 'Experience whereof commeth wysedome [...] The knowledge of this Experience is called Example, and is expressed by historie, whiche of Tulli is called the life of memorie.' (4) Later in the century, amongst Foxe's own contemporaries, the translator William Fulwood declared in the dedicatory address to Robert Dudley prefacing the fruit of his labours, namely the rendering into English of a work by Guglielmo Gratarolo (The Castel of Memorie), that 'Memorie (as Seneca witnesseth) is the principall commoditie and profit that mans nature can receyueth'.
Irish neuroscientist John Foxe claims a cup of cha is the best thing going for your brain.
Then, Foxe says, alpha activity dropped precipitously if a person had gotten theanine--especially in combination with caffeine--indicating that idling neurons had suddenly revved up their activity.