Girolamo Fracastoro

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Fracastoro, Girolamo

 

Born 1478 in Verona; died there Aug. 8, 1553. Italian Renaissance physician, astronomer, and poet.

In 1502, Fracastoro graduated from the university in Padua and subsequently became a professor there. His first scientific works dealt with geology (the history of the earth), geography, optics (light refraction), astronomy (observation of the moon and stars), philosophy, and psychology. In 1530 he published the scientific didactic poem Syphilis sive morbus Gallicus (Syphilis, or the French Disease), from which the disease received its name.

In his major work, De contagione et contagiosis morbis et curatione (On Contagion, Contagious Diseases, and Treatment; 1546), which has been repeatedly reprinted in many countries, Fracastoro presented his theory for the nature, transmission, and treatment of contagious diseases. He described three pathways of infection: (1) through direct contact, (2) through objects known as fomites, (3) over a distance, by way of imperceptible seeds of contagion, which he called seminaria. According to Fracastoro, an infection has a material basis (“contagion is corporal”). Fracastoro was the first to use the term “infection” in the medical sense. He described smallpox, measles, bubonic plague, consumption, rabies, leprosy, and typhus. In the development of his views of the contagious nature of infections, he partially retained (in regard to syphilis) earlier concepts of the transmission of these diseases through a miasma.

Fracastoro’s works laid the foundations for epidemiology and the clinical treatment of infectious diseases.

WORKS

Opera omnia. Venice, 1584.
In Russian translation:
O kontagii, kontagioznykh bolezniakh i lechenii, fascs. 1–3. Introductory article by P. E. Zabludovskii. Moscow, 1954.
O sifilise. Moscow, 1956.

P. E. ZABLUDOVSKII

References in periodicals archive ?
If you are in Pueblo at 4,700-feet elevation, which is about 70 miles south of Pikes Peak (14,000 ft), the elevation change and distance between the two is very similar to what you'd see if standing on the northernmost part of Fracastorius Crater's low floor and looking at its high southern rim.
But Fracastoro wrote many other works as well: Joseph, an epyllion about the Biblical patriarch; a varied collection of lyric poetry that ranges from the rustic pleasures of his country home to panegyrics of important political figures of the day; Homocentrica, a defence of the earth-centered model of the universe; De contagione et contagiosis morbis, the first medical work to argue that the seeds of a disease could be carried through the air; Naugerius, a dialogue named after Andrea Navagero that explores poetry as a Platonic journey toward the idea of beauty; Turrius, a dialogue on how the mind learns and functions; and Fracastorius, a discussion of the soul's immortality that remained incomplete at the author's death.
8 First Quarter Moon First Quarter lunar features Craters 1 Piccolomini 2 Stevinus 3 Fracastorius 4 Theophilus 5 Langrenus * 6 Delambre 7 Macrobius 8 Posidonius 9 Atlas 10 Hercules 11 Burg 12 Eudoxus * 13 Aristoteles * 14 Aristillus 15 Manilius * 16 Julius Caesar 17 Horrocks 18 Hipparchus 19 Albategnius 20 Werner 21 Aliacensis 22 Stofler 23 Maurolycus Mountains TM Taurus CM Caucasus Other features AV Alpine Valley LM Lacus Mortis LS Lacus Somniorum MC Mare Crisium MF Mare Frigoris Mfe Mare Fecunditatis MN Mare Nectaris MS Mare Serenitatis MT Mare Tranquillitatis MV Mare Vaporum RV Rheita Valley * These craters stand out well during a lunar eclipse and can be used to note the progress of the umbra across the lunar disk.
Historically, it is believed that the name originated from a poem written by Hieronymus Fracastorius in 1503, entitled Syphilis Sive Morbus Gallicus, which translates as "Syphilis or the French Disease" (5).
Do we believe that Erasmus and Fracastorius wrote Latin as well as Dr.
For example, I've observed the 77-mile-wide (124-km) crater Fracastorius hundreds of times.
Fracastorius is another obviously tilted crater; it partly formed on the Nectaris Basin's inner ring and partly on the mare.
8] First Quarter Moon First quarter lunar features Craters 1 Piccolomini 2 Stevinus 3 Fracastorius 4 Theophilus 5 Langrenus * 6 Delambre 7 Macrobius 8 Posidonius 9 Atlas 10 Hercules 11 Burg 12 Eudoxus * 13 Aristoteles * 14 Aristillus 15 Manilius * 16 Julius Caesar 17 Horrocks 18 Hipparchus 19 Albategnius 20 Werner 21 Aliacensis 22 Stotler 23 Maurolycus Mountains TM Taurus CM Caucasus Other features AV Alpine Valley LM Lacus Mortis LS Lacus Somniorum MC Mare Crisium MF Mare Frigoris MFe Mare Fecunditatis MN Mare Nectaris MS Mare Serenitatis MT Mare Tranquillitatis MV Mare Vaporum RV Rheita Valley * These craters stand out well during a lunar eclipse and can be used to note the progress of the umbra across the lunar disk.
The edge of Mare Nectaris is an inner ring, visible as a low scarp from Fracastorius crater bending around toward Bohnenberger on the east.
The best example of this is the half-crater Fracastorius along the southern shore of the mare.
The Moon * April 2008 Highlighted Feature Size (miles) Description (A) Apennine Mountains (L4) 375 Southeast rim of Imbrium basin (B) Carpathian Mountains 250 Southern rim of Imbrium basin (C) Altai Scarp (L7) 300 Western rim of Nectaris basin (D) Bullialdus 38 Prominent, complex crater (E) Fracastorius (L21) 77 Crater with partially flooded floor L numbers refer to Charles Wood's Lunar 100 list; see SkyandTelescope.