Francois I

Francois I

(Premier) style
The culmination of the early phase of French Renaissance architecture (1515–1547), named after Francis I, merged Gothic elements with the full use of Italian decoration. Fontainbleau and the chateaux of the Loire, among them Chambord, are outstanding examples.

François I (Premier) style

The culmination of the early phase of French Renaissance architecture named after Francis I (1515–1547), merging Gothic elements with the full use of Italian decoration. Fontainebleau is an outstanding example. (See illustration p. 439.)
References in periodicals archive ?
By the end of his reign, Francois I had vested in d'Annebault more power than in any other councillor.
1495, which early French cataloguers misleadingly called La Belle Ferronniere (the nickname of one of Francois I's mistresses).
InfrastructureLot 5: Francois de Mahy Mahy of Francois I and IV (work residentialisation-DIV).
Plenty of other well chosen narrative details offer continual reminders of broader horizons and possibilities: Francois I's strategic alliance with the Ottoman Turks; the scale and variety of forms of enslavement beyond the Atlantic; the pre-Atlantic, Asian history of sugar cane growing and sugar manufacture, to name but a few.
8 In art, was the Mona Lisa or the Venus de Milo part of Francois I's original Louvre collection?
Among the writings of Marguerite de Navarre, the intimate epitres she exchanged with her mother, Louise de Savoie, and brother, Francois I are relatively unknown.
Although one can agree that Francois I's enterprises at Fontainebleau or Durer's extraordinary oeuvre can be described as 'renaissance', it is difficult to conceive of Antwerp Cathedral or the Goldene Rossl as belonging to the same category.
The "lute-poem" -- a short lyric text in which the poetic subject personifies the lute as a muse, companion, or confidant -- was a popular genre among French poets in the 1540s and 1550s, during the final years of the reign of Francois I, and that of Henri II.
Or the Chateau de Chambord, on which Francois I spent a king's ransom, literally.
With massive erudition meticulously marsh fled, Gadoffre demonstrates how foreign and domestic perceptions of France changed virtually overnight with the accession of Francois I in 1515, and how the prestige of bonae litterae in Francois's court eroded old caste distinctions (noblesse d'epee, noblesse de robe, and bourgeoisie) and created a "new aristocracy" consisting of humanists of diverse origins, who were promoted to positions of power and influence as (for example) chancellors and ambassadors to Venice.
Chateau de Chambord, Francois I's extravagant prize for Worst Dad Of The Renaissance Award, is set in 30 square miles of wooded parkland full of deer and boar.