Frank Borman


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Borman, Frank

 

Born Mar. 14, 1928, in Gary, Indiana. US pilot-astronaut, air force colonel.

Upon graduating from the US Military Academy in 1950, Borman became a military pilot. During the years 1951–56 he served in various flight units of the USA. In 1957 he graduated from the California Institute of Technology, and during the years 1957–60 he taught at the US Military Academy. In 1960 he graduated from the USAF Aerospace Research Pilots School and taught there. In 1962 he became a member of the group of astronauts of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Together with J. Lovell he made a space flight as commander of the spacecraft Gemini which was put into orbit Dec. 4,1965, and flew around the earth 206 times in 14 days (330 hours). Together with W. Anders and J. Lovell, he made a flight as commander of the spacecraft Apollo 8. The craft was put into orbit around the earth on Dec. 21,1968, and then set off from it in the direction of the moon. After completing ten orbits around the moon, the craft returned to earth on Dec. 27, 1968.

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24 (Christmas Eve) and, while the world was watching a live transmission on TV, astronauts William Anders, Jim Lovell and Frank Borman recited the first verses of the Bible.
And yet, Apollo 8 astronaut Frank Borman had met Soviet space official Academician Mstislav V.
If something had gone wrong, the first concern would have been for the astronauts, but Frank Borman, commander of Apollo 8 who was NASA's liaison in the White House on the day, and President Nixon's executive assistant, Dwight Chapin, point out just how much was riding on the mission.
A FEW weeks before the scheduled launch of Apollo 11, which was intended to land the first humans on the moon, presidential speechwriter William Safire got a call from Apollo 8 astronaut Frank Borman. He suggested that the White House might want to have a speech ready in case the mission went awry.
The A300 made a strong impression on Frank Borman, the former Apollo astronaut who headed Eastern Air Lines and championed the idea of buying more economical planes.
|Est: PS700-PS1,000 Gift from an astronaut Lot 335: Frank Borman, NASA astronaut and Commander of Apollo 8, the first mission to fly around the moon, colour photograph (Earthrise or from that series of images), inscribed in bold black ink to mount, 'To Prime Minister Wilson - Best wishes and warm regards, Frank Borman, 5 Feb 1969'.
Perhaps astronaut Commander Frank Borman summed it up best on Christmas Eve 1968, while orbiting the Moon in the spacecraft Apollo 8.
Frank Borman, James Lovell and William Anders became the first men to orbit the Moon in Apollo 8.
Frank Borman, Jim Lovell, and Bill Anders thus became the first humans to arrive at another world.
Frank Borman, 90, claimed he had no wish to land on it as Buzz Aldrin did seven months later and couldn't wait to return to his family.
HEROES: The Apollo 8 crew includes command module pilot James Lovell Jr., left; lunar module pilot William Anders, centre, and mission commander Frank Borman.
Atop the tallest, heaviest and most powerful rocket ever brought to operational status, the Saturn V, sat Apollo 8 with its three-astronaut crew: Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot Jim Lovell and Lunar Module Pilot Bill Anders.