Franny and Zooey


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Franny and Zooey

former child prodigies’ lives are misshapen by their early exploitation. [Am. Lit.: J. D. Salinger Franny and Zooey]
References in periodicals archive ?
Franny and Zooey nunca ha sido tan popular quiza por un mero asunto de personas: la primera persona del singular en The catcher in the rye es fiera y moralizante, es intensa y espantada, y, por ello, termina siendo populachera.
En Franny and Zooey, Salinger actualiza para un mundo arrasado por dos guerras, para una sociedad que se pretendia modelica y solo alcanzaba a mostrar su faceta mas alienante, este estilo indirecto libre.
However Salinger also published several other books, including Nine Stories, Franny and Zooey, Raise High the Roofbeam, Carpenters and Seymour: - An Introduction.
The Glass family--from Salinger's novel Franny and Zooey and his book of short stories Nine Stories--is made up of intellectually precocious prodigies while the Sisler family in Cats In a Chowder is more proficient at America's favorite past-time baseball.
He went on to publish Nine Stories (1953), Franny and Zooey (1961), and Raise High the Roof-Beam, Carpenters; and Seymour: An Introduction (1963).
Salinger's Franny and Zooey by Cara Watkins, a freelance writer in Alameda, California.
Picking up the hints provided by the "recommended home reading" of "the Upanishads and the Diamond Sutra and Eckhart" that the two older Glass boys, Seymour and Buddy, urged on Franny and Zooey (Franny and Zocey 60 (FZ hereafter]), critics have looked for influences and analogues in Hinduism (Alsen), Taoism (Antonio), Zen (Goldstein and Goldstein, "Zen"), and Christianity (Panichas, Slabey).
Franny and Zooey, it further turns out, had both imagined Seymour's symbolic "Fat Lady" as cancerous and as having her "radio going full-blast all day" (FZ 201).
The stories, originally published in The New Yorker magazine, concern Franny and Zooey Glass, two members of the family that was the subject of most of Salinger's short fiction.
Members of the Glass family are also the subject of Franny and Zooey (1961) and Raise High the Roof - Beam, Carpenters; and Seymour: An Introduction (1963), long stories also originally published in The New Yorker.
Originally published in The New Yorker magazine from the late 1940s to the early 1960s, the short fiction about the Glass family was collected in Nine Stories (1953), Franny and Zooey (1961), and Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction (published together in 1963).