Fraunhofer diffraction


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Fraunhofer diffraction

[′frau̇n‚hōf·ər di‚frak·shən]
(optics)
Diffraction of a beam of parallel light observed at an effectively infinite distance from the diffracting object, usually with the aid of lenses which collimate the light before diffraction and focus it at the point of observation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Topics discussed in the book include the foundations of scalar diffraction theory, digital Fourier transforms, simple computations using Fourier transforms, Fraunhofer diffraction and lenses, imaging systems and aberrations, Fresnel diffraction in vacuum, sampling requirements for Fresnel diffraction, relaxed sampling constraints with partial propagations, and propagation through atmospheric turbulence.
4a) can only be satisfied by placing the source in the focal plane of a collimator lens, as on the source side of a Fraunhofer diffraction experiment.
The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern is the Fourier transform of the diffracting object.
Chapters include "Fourier Analysis in Two Dimensions," "Foundations of Scalar Diffraction Theory," and "Fresnel and Fraunhofer Diffraction.
In this first book of its kind, Paganin covers x-ray wave-fields in free space, including Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, Kirshcoff and Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory and partially coherent fields, x-ray interactions with matter, including wave equations in the presence of scatterers, Born series and dynamic scattering and multislice approximation, x-ray sources and their optical elements and detectors, including diffractive, reflective and refractive optical elements as will as virtual optical elements, coherent x-ray imaging including holography and phase retrieval and singular x-ray optics such as Nodal lines, domain walls and other topological phase defects and polynomial vortex solutions to the d'Alembert equation.
An algorithm for computing diffraction effects on total power in the case of Fraunhofer diffraction by a circular lens or aperture is derived.

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