Freaks


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Freaks

1930s macabre movie about sideshow people. [Am. Cinema: Halliwell, 278]
References in classic literature ?
I s'pose you wondered what his object was in turning himself into a sort of dime museum freak."
It's politics that's at the bottom of his freak. All those Elliotts and Crawfords and MacAllisters are dyed-in-the-wool politicians.
But while she said it, Pearl laughed, and began to dance up and down with the humoursome gesticulation of a little imp, whose next freak might be to fly up the chimney.
How much the honest man had suffered in spirit by what he considered the freaks and vagaries of his passengers, and how little he had understood their humors and intentions, is amusingly shown in a letter written to Mr.
And in this matter I am, as I said, a freak--a freak of heredity.
I must again, at the risk of boring, repeat that I am, in this one thing, to be considered a freak. Not alone do I possess racial memory to an enormous extent, but I possess the memories of one particular and far-removed progenitor.
I am a freak of heredity, an atavistic nightmare--call me what you will; but here I am, real and alive, eating three hearty meals a day, and what are you going to do about it?
From these and their degraded slaves and a later intermixture of the blood of the anthropoids sprung the gnarled men of Opar; but by some queer freak of fate, aided by natural selection, the old Atlantean strain had remained pure and undegraded in the females descended from a single princess of the royal house of Atlantis who had been in Opar at the time of the great catastrophe.
He was one of those originals which nature sometimes invents in the freak of a moment, and of which she then breaks the mould.
What is less scientifically justifiable or even valuable is von Hagens' preference for arranging the plastinated corpses not in natural and possibly educational ways, but in ways that effectively show the dead as freaks. A dead, mutilated body that will never decay is perhaps the most different body humans can encounter, and its difference is amplified by the bizarre way in which it is displayed.
CRITICS have called for a ban on a shocking Midland theatre show which they labels disabled people 'freaks'.
"Call them freaks, the underground, the counterculture, flower children or hippies," writes Barry Miles in characteristic prose, they "transformed life in the West as we knew it, introducing a spirit of freedom, of hope, of happiness, of change and of revolution." As a way-late baby boomer (born in 1963) whose affinities run more to the Sex Pistols than to the Summer of Love, I hate to admit that he has a point.